Saw blade

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kristen's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-06 18:59
Saw blade
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When cutting the boards for my first project, the saw made a nice clean cut at the beginning, but the back part of the cut splintered up.  I don't know anything about blades, but it has been mentioned on another post that saws come with a rougher cut blade.  I think this saw still has the original blade.  What do I need to know to buy one that cuts the wood clean for the entire cut?  It is a 12" compound miter saw that I am using if that matters.

 

I don't like to go to orange or blue not knowing a thing about what I'm asking for.  I'm already a little intimidated walking to that end of the store.  Thanks for any knowledge you can pass on!

Tsu Dho Nimh's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-05 20:30

Several things can make a splintered cut:

 

1 – Wrong kind of blade. Just ask the guys in the tools section – they are nice. Or read the blade packages. ADDING: The higher the number of teeth, the smoother the cut ... but also the slower the cut and the hotter the blade gets.

 

2 – Blade set too deep (on circular saws and table saws, not miter saws). You need to raise or lower the blade until only about 1/2 inch is extending past the wood.

 

3 – Dull blade …if you are building an entire houseful of furniture, learn how to sharpen blades.

 

4 – Wrong technique. Make sure the saw is on a sturdy work surface, and the board is shoved HARD against the backstop of the saw. Clamp it if you have to – I don't have .  Then start the blade and in one smooth move, push it down and through the wood, let it back up, and then turn the blade off. ADDING: Don't push super fast ... it's a saw, not an axe!

Practice a bit … take a 2x4 and slice it like bread until you don't flinch wnen the saw blade kicks in. You can sand these and let kids play blocks with them later.

kristen's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-06 18:59

Thanks for the good advice--you always have helpful answers to questions on the community!

 

I bought a DeWalt 12" 80T blade to replace the original 40T blade that had already seen some decent amount of use (so probably duller than ideal).  The difference was remarkable--clean cuts all the way through.  SO much better now.

pinktoesandpowertools.com

lostandconfused's picture
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Joined: 2010-10-05 22:09

Tsu Dho Nimh said:

...Then start the blade and in one smooth move, push it down and through the wood, let it back up, and then turn the blade off...


Generally good tips - but I'd disagree with that last point about letting the saw up whilst the blade is still running, mainly for safety, but also for accuracy of cut.

I've always been taught to let the saw stop before raising it. If you raise the saw whilst still spinning, it could catch on the offcut piece and launch it somewhere, as well as potentially marking the workpiece too. It's especially dangerous if you're using a stop block, or have a saw with some play in the mechanism (i.e. a cheap one!).

See here for more discussion on the subject - http://www.bt3central.com/show.....hp?t=17290

Not everyone does this all the time (see Ana's youtube videos for example!), but I think it's a good precaution nevertheless.

Tsu Dho Nimh's picture
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lostandconfused said:

Tsu Dho Nimh said:

...Then start the blade and in one smooth move, push it down and through the wood, let it back up, and then turn the blade off...


Generally good tips - but I'd disagree with that last point about letting the saw up whilst the blade is still running, mainly for safety, but also for accuracy of cut.

I've always been taught to let the saw stop before raising it. If you raise the saw whilst still spinning, it could catch on the offcut piece and launch it somewhere, as well as potentially marking the workpiece too.


Good point! I have not had a problem with the saw tossing pieces around ... YET! But it only takes one flying chunk of 1x4 to ruin your day.

 

I'll do it your way from now on.

lostandconfused's picture
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Tsu Dho Nimh said:

...it only takes one flying chunk of 1x4 to ruin your day.

Well put! May your power sawing be free of flying 1x4s henceforth.

louiesrunningbuddy's picture
Joined: 2011-01-01 17:25

Thanks Kristen for posting this.  I had the same problem today and now I have some different things to try!

kristen's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-06 18:59

You're welcome!  The 80T blade made a world of difference for me.  I think I am going to take Tsu Doh Nim's advice and learn how to sharpen my own blades though.  They are a bit pricey in the 12" size, I thought.

 

Good luck!

pinktoesandpowertools.com

Jake's picture
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Joined: 2012-04-20 20:12
Very good comments

Good advice. I would not be timid about asking for help in the tool section of big blue or big orange. Try to find the guy or gal you see there a lot. Now a good blade could cost upwards of $40 but it is really really worth it. Take the present blade with you so the size is correct. Another technique is to put a sacrificial board under your good board. It helps prevent tearing out like you described.

Jake

kobra55's picture
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Joined: 2013-04-16 02:13
Saws were made

Saws were made laboriously by hand. The teeth were filed out separately then set by striking swap teeth with a hammer against a bet or small anvil. Hand saws classically have a moderately thick blade to make them firm sufficient to cut through material. http://www.swordsswords.com/Switchblade-Knives.aspx