how to cut a hole in a piece of wood?

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rubidoux's picture
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Joined: 2010-12-10 17:38
how to cut a hole in a piece of wood?
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I'm planning on making the play kitchen with smaller fridge for my almost two year old and I'm so excited!  But after reading the plans, I'm worried that it's a little advanced for me.  I have already gotten the wood for the sink and stove and had it cut at the store, but haven't gotten started.  So, so far, these are my Qs:

 

In the first step, you're supposed to attatch one side, the bottom shelf, and the toekick.  So, first you nail the side to the shelf, which are perpendicular to each other, but I can't picture how I'm going to be holding it all together while I'm nailing.  Can I just put the side across a stack of books that's the same height as the shelf?  and then the shelf along side the stack?  If so, does my stack have to be *exactly* the height of the shelf board?  (Here is a link to the plans in case the diagram is helpful:  http://ana-white.com/2009/10/g....._9146.html

 

And then, later in the plans, after the whole piece is put together, I'm supposed to cut a hole in the countertop for my sink.  I'm wondering if you do that after it's put together because then your counter is held up so you don't have the problem of holding onto it while cutting?  Or might it be easier to cut that hole before putting it together?  And how on earth am I going to cut that hole???  lol  I can use dh's drill to start (I'm imagining you need a hole to get the saw in?), but I don't think we have the proper saw for this purpose.  What do I need?  And is it going to be as hard as it sounds?  Just thinking about how exhausting it was to carve our pumpkin last year and I'm worried. 

 

And one more Q -- I bought screws and a countersink bit bc I was looking at the getting started section and thought you put things together with the screws and then used the finishing nails for some kind of "finishing".  But it looks like "finishing nails" are not so much for finishing but for putting things together.  So, I have no finishing nails here, but dh says he's got a bunch of other nails.  Can I improvise?  Or should I make a trip to the hardware store?  It looks like I could use the screws, but I feel like it might be overwhelming to be using the drill around my little guy.  Nails just seem simpler, but I could be wrong about that.

 

Ok, I'm gonna go bring my wood in from the car!  :)

 

Oh -- one more thing -- I have managed to avoid joining facebook so far and I really don't want to, but I do want to see what other people are doing with these knockoffwood plans.  Is there really a lot to see there?

Tsu Dho Nimh's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-05 20:30

What kind of saw do you have?

 

"Finishing" nails are what you call nails that have a head that is barely larger than the rest of the nail.It is meant to be used where the finish (the looks) is important. They can be quite small (brads used to hold trim on) or large enough to hold furniture together. You can tap the nail into the wood and fill the holes to have an invisible fastener.

 

"Common" nails are the ones with the big, flat head, used for rougher construction like making walls and roofs.

rubidoux's picture
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Joined: 2010-12-10 17:38

I think I have my saw issue worked out.  I bought an electric jigsaw today.  And I've already sunk my first few nails.  Of course, I completely forgot the glue.  D'oh.  I'm hoping the will make it a bit easier t hold my boards together while hammering.  I have to readjust after every two hits or so.  I think I'm doing it in an awkward position bc I'm short and I'm working on to of our dining room table, but I've got my little guy wandering around here, so it seems a little safer that way.  I'm thinking I've already done the hardest part (until I get to that hole) since I put those first two boards together.  That two big boards at a 90 degree angle thing is just too awkward, but I did a pretty nice job, imho.  :)

Tsu Dho Nimh's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-05 20:30

Glue is not meant to hold things together while you hammer. You have to hold the two surfaces together tightly while the glue dries.

 

To hold things together for assembly you need to use clamps or get someone to hold it.

prismax's picture
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Joined: 2010-12-14 12:55

To cut the hole you need to drill a hole in the waste material that is bigger than your jigsaw blade.  Then insert the jigsaw blade into that hole and follow close to your line(1/16 for beginners, 1/32 for more skilled) on the waste side of the line.  It helps to put an X on all waste pieces before hand.  Then after you complete your circle cut you file or sand to your line.  This may take some time and work, but you will have a nice circle in the end.

OkieJoe's picture
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Joined: 2010-12-16 02:20

The easiest way I've found to drill a pilot hole for cutting is to use a spade bit, like this Irwin Speedbor Standard Length 1 in. Flat Bit 1768424 http://www.homedepot.com/Tools.....ogId=10053, in the waste part of the wood, then use your new jigsaw to cut out where you need to go. Often, I'll drill a hole at each corner of a square cutout, which reduces the amount of angle cuts I have to make w/the saw. As far as holding the work pieces perpendicular to each other while you glue/screw, try something like this:Simpson Strong-Tie A33 Galvanized 12-Gauge Steel 90-Degree Angle A33 , http://www.homedepot.com/Build.....ogId=10053. Clamp one board to one outside face, the other board to the other face, and you now have an easy way to create a 90 degree angle, consistently. Total layout is less than $10, for both. Using a clamping square like this will make it much easier to build square, and that will make everything easier.

Tsu Dho Nimh's picture
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Joined: 2010-09-05 20:30

OkieJoe said:

As far as holding the work pieces perpendicular to each other while you glue/screw, try something like this:Simpson Strong-Tie A33 Galvanized 12-Gauge Steel 90-Degree Angle A33 , http://www.homedepot.com/Build.....ogId=10053.

Clamp one board to one outside face, the other board to the other face, and you now have an easy way to create a 90 degree angle, consistently. Total layout is less than $10, for both. Using a clamping square like this will make it much easier to build square, and that will make everything easier.


WOW!  Utterly genius tip. It eliminates the need for a right-angle clamp and is infinitely re-sizable.