Mod Bar - Stemware Hutch

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Keywords: 
free, diy, plans, bar, bar system, pottery barn, hutch, stemware, shelves, easy, do it yourself,
Dimensions: 
17 3/4"W x 15 3/4"D x 34 3/4"H
Dimensions: 

10 feet of 1x12 boards – for three hutches, use a single sheet of plywood cut into 11 ¾” wide strips 8 feet long. Make longest cuts first.
2 – 1x2 @ 8 feet long
1 – 1x3 @ 8 feet long
2 – 2x2 @ 8 feet long
Use ¼” plywood from base to cover back.

Common Materials: 
1 1/4 inch screws
2 inch screws
1 1/4 inch finish nails
1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws
2 1/2 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
wood filler
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
hammer
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
jigsaw
compound miter saw
table saw
nailer
sander
countersink drill bit
Cut List: 

2 – 1x12 @ 34” (sides)
4 – 1x2 @ 11 ¾” (width of 1x12s)
4 – 2x2 @ 34”
6 – 1x3 @ 12”
2 – 1x2 @ 12”
1 – 2x2 @ 14 ¾”
1 – 1x2 @ 17 ¾”
1 – 1x12 @ 17 ¾”
1 – 1x3 @ 17 ¾”
2 – 1x2 @ 14 ¾”
1 – 1x12 @ 14 ¾”
¼” plywood @ 17 ¾” x 34 ¾” (See base plan)

Project Type: 
Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 
Style: 
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Step 1

Cut your 1x2 trim to the width of your 1 x 12 boards, and nail to the sides using glue and 1 1/4" finish nails.

Step 2

Attach the side trim with either pocket hole screws set for 3/4" stock and 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, or by nailing 2" finish nails through the sides.

Summary: 

Plans to build a stemware hutch inspired by Pottery Barn's modular bar collection. Build your own with free, step-by-step plans.

Step 3

Nail 1x3s to the sides using glue and 1 1/4" finish nails. You may have to adjust it's length, depending on the width of your 1 x 12

Step 4

Nail 1x2s to the underside of the 1x3s added in the previous step using glue and 1 1/4" finish nails.

Step 5

Attach your front apron with pocket holes set for 1 1/2" stock and 2 1/2" pocket hole screws, or by countersinking screws through the sides (if you choose to use pocket holes, you can put the pre-drilled hole at the top of the piece and it will be covered in the next step)

Step 6

Using pocket holes set for 3/4" stock, build the top using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws. Then attach the top to the base with glue and 1 1/4" finish nails, keep the sides and back flush.

Step 7

Build your shelves as shown above with pocket holes. Then you can attach them with pocket holes from the underside, or shelf pins for adjustable shelves.

Step 8

Build the remaining stemware pieces and attach to top.

Step 9

Step 9 Instructions: 

And finally, the back.

Finishing Instructions

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

Comments

Hi and thanks! :-) I built a bottom shelf for this, so I just screwed through the bottom shelf into the base. I also added some 1x3 braces to the back of mine so that I could screw it into the wall (one under the stemware "slides", and one under the middle shelf).

I love this! And we really need to build a bar/liquor cabinet/hutch of some sort (already have two china hutches, but still have things that don't fit, how sad is that!?)

But with toddlers and teenagers and all ages in between, I don't think the open wine storage in the bottom will work :) We need something that closes and preferably something that locks..

Maybe I could put a glass door on it or something?

If you want the hutch, build the hutch, with or without door. If you're worried about your kids drinking, that's a conversation you should have with them that's separate from the furniture.

The lock is a non-issue with your kids and booze. I lived with an underage alcoholic who never once touched my well-stocked and unlocked cabinet. In my youth, although I was far from temperate, I never bothered taking anybody else's booze either. A teenager after something that's been forbidden will move heaven and earth to lay hands on it.

Clay - I agree wholeheartedly about teaching them about drinking, and actually I do trust my teen. She's only 12 so I guess she's not technically a teen yet, but will be soon. I just like the idea of having it behind a closed door at least so its not a temptation. I think when she has friends over, or we hire a babysitter, or whatever, I'd rather not have it sitting open for her to have to worry about someone wanting. Probably silly of me.

And a moot point because the 1 and 3 year olds would spill/break/play with it long before anyone would drink it! They spilled a whole container of margarita salt that was sitting with the wine in our current open configuration - took weeks to sweep it all up because I tried to let roomba pick it up and it got spread into a thin layer all over my living room...

Add a door and put a Totlock on it. It's completely invisible from the outside, so it won't alert an unfamiliar person to the way to get it open. And it keeps the toddlers out too.

Add a door and put a Totlock on it. It's completely invisible from the outside, so it won't alert an unfamiliar person to the way to get it open. And it keeps the toddlers out too.

It's just a small styrofoam ball that I painted brown and hot glued corks to. I made a BIG one that required 200+ corks, but the kid decided it was better taken apart and shredded. It was awesome, unlike this measly li'l one :-)

I'm in the middle of building my display cabinet for my breakfast area and I just saw this one. I think I'm going to steal from your plan and add the hanging glass thingy on mine :-) (don't drink much wine but I like how it looks)

I want to build this for my wife, but I don't quite understand how to do the stemare holders. What is their size and spacing, and how did you attach them? Did you nail them to the top before you nailed that on?

Thanks for the great project!

Sizing and spacing of the stemware holders is fairly easy. You need to size them big enough to hold your stemware, and space them far enough apart to fit your stemware into them.

It's easiest to figure out by cutting the top piece, then setting up a row of stemware on top of it. Because people have different sized glasses, size it to the stemware that you have. Set 1x material on edge between the glasses, and that marks the position of your rails in the final cabinet.

Hi Cindy! I spent $143 on the bar (that's for both the hutch and the wine-grid base, including hardware, pocket hole screws and sandpaper ;-) ) - If you decide to do it without the cove moulding (I still haven't added mine), that'll save you about $15.

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