Hello! I’m Ana, a mother and homemaker from Alaska.
Skeching
100’s of FREE plans!!
You can make ANYTHING!
stick
img
sticks
img

Dryer Vent

January 15, 2013 |

Missed a Momplex Post?

We are DIYing our moms a Duplex in Alaska! Check out our progress so far as we owner build a home, step by step. Read the Momplex blog here.

posted by Ana White

Do you ever wonder what happens between your dryer and the vent outside?

We are in the utility installing phase of the Momplex. We are starting with who has the biggest pipes and working our way down to the smallest. First up, we installed 6" diameter piping for the ventilation system. To get the ceiling insulated to hold heat, we've already installed bathroom and kitchen vents as well.

Next up is the dryer vent.

And of course, since this is the Momplex, we gotta do everything twice. Otherwise one Mom will say, Oh no, I don't need a dryer, save it for the other Mom. And the other will say the same thing and we'll end up with two clotheslines out the front of the Momplex.

Dryer Vent

Dryer vent pipe is 4" in diamenter, which is still too wide to go through a 2x4 interior wall. It has to be squished a little to get through the studs.

Dryer Vent

We use a smaller hole saw bit to drill two holes instead of just one.

Dryer Vent

The Ram's wood eating machine to the rescue.

Dryer Vent

And the second hole is drilled right next to the first.

Dryer Vent

Then we just need to connect to the dots.

Dryer Vent

The best tool we found for this is the sawsall. It can reach in pretty tight places and since pretty isn't top priority here, it does the job quickly.

Dryer Vent

Ah, look he made me a heart!

Dryer Vent

Pipe fits!

Dryer Vent

We've got one dryer vent stubbed through.

Dryer Vent

Down below the Ram pushes the pipe up, and it's my job to line the pipe up into the dryer vent box.

Dryer Vent

The pipe has to go back to circular from oblong to fit in the dryer vent box opening. I know, I'm trying to make my job actually seem difficult ... it is not.

Dryer Vent

One down ... or should I say up? We've still got the downstairs to do.

Dryer Vent

Downstairs the pipe is stubbed out. Notice that the stubbed out end is crimped? That's because with a dryer, you have to run the pipes so the crimped end always fits inside the smooth end as air (and lint) travels outward. If you don't, lint will build up and best case scenario is your dryer runs inefficiently. Worst case scenario you've got a lint fire.

Dryer Vent

So we've already got a problem. Where we've stubbed out the dryer vent to the outside wall, the pipe has the crimped end out.

So we have to cut the crimped end off.

Much better, no lint magnet here!

From the exterior vent, we will run ducting to the piped stubbed down from upstairs.  The first pipe is connected to the exterior vent.

We'll need to support the pipe on this long of a run.

To support the pipe, boards are screwed to the joist under the pipe.

And then we can just connect the stubbed down pipe to the ducting run to the exterior vent.

And then tape everything up.

Uh, did I say tape?  

Ever possible spot where air could leak gets taped up.  

Dryer vents, check.

So what's left?

Next we will finish up any drains.  Then we'll run central vac if we decide to go that route.  And then it's water supply lines.  And I do believe that's it for pipes, with the exception of the heat system.  After that we'll be running wire.

So how does your dryer vent?  Do you have problems with it? Or have you never had to even think about it because it never causes any problems?

Watching your progress has

Watching your progress has been the highlight of my weeks and months; your posts are so informative, fun and inspiring. It's been especially enjoyable and exciting now that it's all moving so quickly. Thanks for letting us read along with all your hard work!

posted by AmandaW (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 15:02
clips
bhoppy's picture

dryer vent issues

I really enjoyed reading about this... I've been living in a house for a few months and I've had a problem with the dryer vent since the day we moved in. The dryer vent literally runs from a pipe a few inches long from the vent and then it opens up into the crawl space directly under the house... that is it. Seems kinda dangerous don't ya think? Fire hazard anyone?? It bothers me more so now after reading all the trouble you guys have gone through to properly vent the dryer vents for your moms!!

posted by bhoppy | on Tue, 2013-01-15 16:12
clips
Pam the Goatherd's picture

bhoppy, my husband has been

bhoppy, my husband has been an appliance tech for almost 30 years so he's seen a lot of dryer venting situations. Actually your dryer venting directly into the crawl space is not a problem or a hazard. Our dryer at home does the exact same thing and I've never had a problem with it in the 15 years we've been in this house. Just make sure you clean the lint filter/screen after every load and you won't have any problems with lint build-up.
The only problem I have encountered personally with this set-up is that the neighborhood cats like to go into our crawl space and sit right under the dryer vent in the winter. I can tell when they are down there because my clothes don't get dry on the first cycle and I have to run them through again.

posted by Pam the Goatherd | on Tue, 2013-01-15 23:33

Dryer venting

I believe the reason to vent your dryer away from the underside of your home is to prevent moisture from causing rot, which attracts bugs, termites etc.

posted by AnnaM (not verified) | on Fri, 2013-01-18 01:47

Condensers

I'm completely in awe of everything you've done, but wouldn't it be easier to use a condenser dryer?

posted by Tomgodfrey (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 16:18
clips

Definitely go with the

Definitely go with the central vac! Especially for a multi-story home! Lugging a vacuum up the stairs is not fun, and those little vent dustpans are fabulous in bathrooms/kitchens. Not to mention how quiet they are in the house! My MIL has one and LOVES it.

posted by CGCouture | on Tue, 2013-01-15 17:42

Check your length for 4" vent

Check your length for 4" vent pipe for the dryers and keep in mind each 90 adds 5' to overall length. 45's are 2.5' I believe the current standard is 25' run before you need to look at a booster inline. Check the specs for your particular dryer.

If you do run a booster, you should keep it 15' or so from the actual dryer to give the lint a chance to dry out before hitting the booster and causing a possible clog. You also would need access to the booster for bi-anal inspection and cleaning so consider that for placement and attachment methods to the pipe.. Another options to consider is to you have a long enough 4" duct brush to run the line at least once a year to remove lint build up. Even with smooth metal pipe, it still builds up. Also in your cold climate, you might want to consider a draft blocker inline, again with easy of access and removal for at least once a year cleaning.

posted by Chris McG (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 19:43
clips
Pam the Goatherd's picture

Chris makes the same points

Chris makes the same points that I was going to post.
Another thing about your dryer venting set-up that concerns me is the height of that vent box. If I'm seeing that right it means that the exhaust is going to have to make an immediate 90 degree turn out of the dryer to go up to the box, then it will have to make a 180 degree turn to go back down to the basement. That 180 degree turn is a major problem that could render your dryer completely ineffective and burn up thermostats like crazy!

posted by Pam the Goatherd | on Tue, 2013-01-15 23:40

Pam the Goatherd

It looks like the dryer will be stacked on top of the washer in this space; That would put the vent box exactly where it needs to be.

posted by Janet Crit (not verified) | on Wed, 2013-01-16 08:47
clips
Pam the Goatherd's picture

That makes sense! Thanks,

That makes sense! Thanks, Janet.

posted by Pam the Goatherd | on Wed, 2013-01-16 18:59

Check your length for 4" vent

Check your length for 4" vent pipe for the dryers and keep in mind each 90 adds 5' to overall length. 45's are 2.5' I believe the current standard is 25' run before you need to look at a booster inline. Check the specs for your particular dryer.

If you do run a booster, you should keep it 15' or so from the actual dryer to give the lint a chance to dry out before hitting the booster and causing a possible clog. You also would need access to the booster for biannual inspection and cleaning so consider that for placement and attachment methods to the pipe. The booster will need electric and a relay tied to the dryer and/or air flow sensor. Another item to consider is to you have a long enough 4" duct brush to run the line at least once a year to remove lint build up. Even with smooth metal pipe, lint still builds up. Also in your cold climate, you might want to consider a draft blocker inline, again with easy of access and removal for at least once a year cleaning.

posted by Chris McG (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 19:47

Our newly installed Broan

Our newly installed Broan Eco-vent insulated dryer exhaust had both ends of the pipe crimped. I wondered why since I've never seen that before. If I cut the end off there is no way it would reach far enough to go through the exterior wall. Our dryer runs only about a foot because it goes straight out the main floor exterior wall to the outside. How long is that run of ducting? I always thought dryer venting could only be a certain maximum length, and you have to subtract length for any corners as well? I read it would cause the dryer to be inefficient.

posted by Kim Eminem (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 20:51

when we first moved in.. our

when we first moved in.. our washer dryer were in the kitchen.. this was not all that great.. but they had installed laundry hook ups in the basement utility room so we could move things down there. Then we got things down there and realized that they had forgotten to put in the dryer vent.. *oops* It was winter and we really didn't want to drag everything back upstairs (and at that point, going up and down the stairs to do laundry was about my only exercise and physical therapy while recovering from a car accident..) so we decided to go ahead and hook things up and "cheat" for a little bit.. hubby ran the dryer vent into a box he made. one end of the box was open but screened off with a furnace filter and the dryer vent hose connected to one of the other sides. this box then sat on top of the dryer (front loaders) for about the next year and a half (hubby got deployed before he got the chance to fix things proper.. so it waited for him..) it worked.. and helped keep the basement warmer while doing laundry.. but it was very nice when he got back and could properly put a hole in the wall for the vent.. though it was nice to be able to open the box and collect and clear all the lint.. dryer lint is actually good for a few things (ok, fire starters for camping is the big one...)

posted by BookladyDavina (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 20:51

Indoor dryer vents

In reference to a previous comment it's not recommend to vent any clothes dryer indoors (even if they do sell kits for just that purpose). The amount of humidity released quickly into an enclosed area can very quickly cause mold and mildew in your home.

posted by Anon (not verified) | on Tue, 2013-01-15 22:21

I have never seen a drier

I have never seen a drier vent before, every drier I have ever owned just has a lint filter, and I have never seen any set up for a drier vent in any house I have lived in (and I have lived in a lot due to being a military baby). Maybe in Australia we just don't use them?

posted by NatashaC (not verified) | on Wed, 2013-01-16 01:10

Humidity and extreme cold

I'm surprised, Ana, that you don't have to do something special with all that humid air before just ejecting it out into the extremely cold winter air. Won't it freeze and cause build up on your vent?

posted by Matthew (not verified) | on Wed, 2013-01-16 10:47

Venting a dryer into attic or crawlspace

I read above that some have seemingly successfully terminated the dryers' exhaust into the crawlspace. I agree completely with the comment that it should not, and that is creates a mold and dust particle issues, very unhealthy for the people and the construction components. The code is very clear in terminating to the exterior. When and if you sell your home, and the buyers have an inspector, they will require this to be fixed. Just a heads up.

Also, noticed that you used a "down box" version of the dryerbox and mounted it mid wall. This will not work, and you will find out when you go to drywall. The small flange at the bottom, was designed to sit on the floor and cover up the portion of the pipe that goes through the bottom, that is out in the plane of the drywall.
The right box would have been the Model 350 installed upside down. See the image here http://www.dryerbox.com/photo_gallery/Digital/24.htm
At the least, if drywall has not commenced, I would call the local Heating supply house and inquire if they have a Model 350 Dryerbox.
It is interesting to so many participating in this thread. Feel free to run anything by me, I’ve been solely involved with dryer venting for 16 years.

posted by Rick H (not verified) | on Thu, 2013-01-17 11:40

Wow!

Hi Ana,

I have been checking in on your family's progress on the Momplex over the past several months. I just wanted to leave a note of encouragement. I love your blog, and anytime there is a new update, I get so excited to see what new things you have accomplished together.

I enjoy all the photos, and am constantly amazed at how far you guys have come.

It also astounds me how many people are willing to help you out, sometimes pointing out mistakes. And you accept your mistakes so humbly with the desire to improve.

You are truly an inspiration. And I don't say that in vain-you have inspired me to be brave enough to tackle building one of your plans from the plan catalogue. Over the holidays my husband, brother and I built a coffee table.
Our first serious DIY project of many more to come.

Thank you Ana and fam! :D

posted by Doyletron (not verified) | on Thu, 2013-01-17 16:19
clips
Ana White's picture

Hi Rick, thank you so much

Hi Rick, thank you so much for the insight. We will definitely look into and inquire about the 350 Dryerbox. Thanks for watching out for us! Ana

posted by Ana White | on Thu, 2013-01-17 19:20

Glad to see the solid vent pipe!

I'm a home inspector, and I'm very glad to see you are using solid metal for the dryer vent! We see far too many vinyl dryer vent hoses. Some clients think the flexible metal-looking pipe is safe, but that's also plastic on the inside and is a major cause of house fires.
Previous posters are correct to be concerned about the long run. The rule around here is that a dryer vent run must not exceed 25 feet, and every 90-degree bend counts as five feet. So you can have 20 feet of pipe with one 90-degree bend in it. After that, you really need to install a booster fan.
Humidity is one issue with venting a dryer inside the house. The other is that dryer lint is flammable! Especially if you use dryer sheets; these leave a waxy coating on the lint that makes it even more prone to ignition given the right conditions. It's really quite something to see an entire attic buried in a thick layer of dryer lint because the owner had no idea their dryer was venting there.

posted by Welmoed (not verified) | on Sun, 2013-01-20 13:32

The car is programmed to have

The car is programmed to have the intelligence to be safe and to get you to your destination without your participation. You can then text, do email, read the paper or maybe even have a drink. Hey, you are not driving, why not? It is nice to have a car like this to get you home safely after an evening of partying, that is, if you can remember where you parked the car. Mercedes Benz Cars

posted by reshhia | on Fri, 2013-05-10 03:05

I'm surprised, Ana, that you

I'm surprised, Ana, that you don't have to do something special with all that humid air before just ejecting it out into the extremely cold winter air. Won't it freeze and cause build up on your vent?منتديات

posted by alasiri | on Sun, 2013-05-19 08:00

Thanks Ana

It's good to see progress is still being made although this post is from quite a while ago. I am going to refer back to this when I start a project of my own, so thanks for sharing.

Right now I'm just working on another project that is actually online, my Nike sock blog... I'm serious, don't laugh; take a peak. Anyway, thanks again Ana and please keep up the good work.

posted by murrjohn987 | on Mon, 2013-07-08 19:14

Recent comments

Social

Let's Connect

Tweets

  •  

User login

Not Much >>

What's going on up here in Alaska.

Momplex Cam >>

Momplex Cam >>

We are DIYing our moms a Duplex in Alaska! Check out our progress so far as we owner build a home, step by step. Read the Momplex blog here.

Special Thanks

The free content provicded by this website is made possible by the following current sponsors.  Thank you!


   

Momplex Vanilla Kitchen Plans and How-Tos


Check out how we DIYed a full kitchen here!

Momplex
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan
Momplex
Project Plan
Project Plan
Momplex
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan
Project Plan
Momplex
Project Plan
Project Plan
Momplex
Momplex
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan
Momplex
Video
Momplex
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan
Momplex
Momplex
Project Plan

Handmade Holiday Gift Plan Tutorials

Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan
Project Plan