Rocking On!

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I'd be doing a happy dance right now, but given the condition of the Momplex floor (more on that soon!) it's highly not recommended. For the sake of my work boots.

We are done with drywalling the Momplex upstairs!

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Momplex: 
Step 1 Diagram: 
Step 1: 

The last sheets upstairs went on in the hallway just yesterday. We have been holding off on the hallway as the heat system all ties in through the hall closet, and it's the last little bit to get drywalled up stairs.

Step 2 Diagram: 
Step 2 Instructions: 

And it's done done done!!!

Step 3 Diagram: 
Step 3 Instructions: 

Here's the living room area overlooking the stair openings. When we designed the stairs, we figured in drywall, so there's no drywalling around stair steps. We just pulled the stairs, drywalled the entire landing, and will put the stairs back in after mudding and taping.

Step 4 Diagram: 
Step 4 Instructions: 

This is the hall closet for coats or vacuums and brooms and other stuff. That's one thing I didn't get cheap on in the Momplex - there's lots of closet space. The heat systems will tie into manifolds installed in these closets. We'll get to that in a bit!

Step 5 Diagram: 
Step 5 Instructions: 
Here's the dining area. I really love this space. The window is perfect, and there's ample space for a good sized table and seating. I'm already picturing a mirror on that far wall!
Step 6 Diagram: 
Step 6 Instructions: 
And this is what the great room looks like - I promise, it's bigger than it looks in this photo! We ended up drywalling in a 2x6 pony wall for the kitchen. All the plumbing is tied in for the sink in this wall.
Step 7 Diagram: 
Step 7 Instructions: 
Here's the small bedroom. Really, it's an office or a guest room, so we made them pretty small.
Step 8 Diagram: 
Step 8 Instructions: 
The larger bedroom is big enough for a king bed with 3 feet of space on all sides. I'm such a fan of just right sized rooms up here in Alaska where heating bills can be so high.
Step 9 Diagram: 
Step 9 Instructions: 
But even the small bedroom gets a walk in closet, although small.
Step 10 Diagram: 
Step 10 Instructions: 
And the larger bedroom gets a nice, long closet, with a window! It will have shelves on one side, and the other hooks for accessories.
Step 11 Diagram: 
Step 11: 
I've learned a ton this time around about drywalling. This isn't the first time I've done drywall, but it sure seems like this time, we got drywall down to a science. First, you mark all studs and boxes on the floor.
Step 12 Diagram: 
Step 12: 
And also mark all wall ducts to prevent screwing or nailing into them.
Step 13 Diagram: 
Step 13: 
Then you just measure your sheets and cut with a utility knife. We always score the drywall on the finished side first, then bed it and cut the paper along the back edge on the fold to complete the cut. A drywall square is a life saver here. Not only do you use it for cutting, but it doubles in helping you mark out all your screw holes.
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Step 14: 
We use this tool a ton too.
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Step 15: 

When you cut drywall by breaking it along a scored edge, sometimes the edge can be a little uneven.  You can also use this tool to take a little off a cut edge without having to recut the drywall.

Another trick the Ram taught me was for spots like this don't even bother measuring and cutting your drywall.  Just put a piece up that is bigger than you need, and trim it in place.  It's even quicker to trim with a utility knife and break the edge in place, but here, we've got such a tiny bit to trim, the rotozip is the tool of choice.

We use the rotozip also for cutting out boxes from drywall hung in place.  There's not measuring and cutting out each box by hand on the ground and then hanging.  We do the same for doorways and other openings.

We've still got the downstairs drywall to hang, including the ceilings, and the downstairs walls are 9 feet instead of 8, so we've got our work (not) cut out (yet) for us!  I'm working on a video tutorial of the step by step process of hanging drywall so look for that next week if you are interested in all the steps to DIY drywall!

So have you drywalled your home?  Did you use the same tools?  Got a special trick that'll save us tons of time on the downstairs?  We'd love to hear your thoughts on this very dry subject!

Rock on!

Ana

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