Cabin Bunk System - Top Bunk

The top bunk for the Cabin Bunk System.  Features full guardrails and slatted mattress support.  Works with the rest of the Cabin Collection to create a complete storage and sleeping center.

Thanks for being patient with me this week.  I will try to get caught up on emails and comments to the best of my ability.  A special thanks to everyone that has helped others out in the past few days.

Author Notes: 

Well, the flu visited us this week.

It started with Grace being oddly lethargic and a little warm, woke me up in the middle of the night with the shivers, and hit a real low as I attempted to take a hot bath to relieve body aches . . . only to have Grace throw up within minutes . . . in my bath.
I just shook my head and thought, motherhood.  You aren't even given the luxury of being sick.
And it occurred to me that perhaps why we see so many mothers picking up saws to build beds and tables and desks for their families is because using a saw is nothing to a mother, who let's little get in the way of providing the best home for her child.  What would you rather do?  Have a full on flu, attempt to find some relief in a hot bath, just to have your child throw up in your bath?  Or put some earplugs in and some safety glasses on and cut a board?  Building is easy in contrast.
The last major project that the Ram and I took on was a Cabin Media Wall.  And we find ourselves still looking at it in awe, thinking, wow, we actually made this!  And we are very very pleased with the look, the solidness, and the size.
So I wanted to add some more plans to this collection.  And because my nieces are needing bunk beds, (if you are looking for more of a girly bunk system, that's on the way too) I drew up a design that I am excited to share with you.
Shopping List: 

2 - 1x6 @ 10 feet long

1/2 Sheet - 3/4" plywood, MDF or particle board (4 feet x 4 feet)
4 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long
6 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long
4 - 1x3 @ 8 feet long
This list does not include wood slats
1 1/4 inch finish nails
2 inch finish nails
1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws
2 1/2 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
wood filler
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
nailer
sander
level
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Fits standard twin mattress. Shown dimensions of complete system.
Cut List: 

2 - 3/4" Plywood, MDF or Particle Board @ 39" x 21 3/4" (Panels)

2 - 2x2 @ 39" (Panel tops)
2 - 1x6 @ 39" (Panel bottom trim)
4 - 2x2 @ 24" (Legs)
2 - 1x6 @ 75" (Siderails)
28 - 1x2 @ 8" (Guardrail rails)
4 - 1x2 @ 16" (Guardrail ends)
1 - 1x3 @ 63 1/2" (Guardrail top, ladder side)
1 - 1x3 @ 75" (Guardrail top, back side)
1 - 1x3 @ 60 1/2" (Guardrail bottom, ladder side)
1 - 1x3 @ 72" (Guardrail bottom, back side)
2 - 2x2 @ 75" (Cleats)
Bunkie Board or 1x3s @ 39" to mattress specs
10 - 1x2 @ 16 1/4" (Headboard Trim)
Cutting Instructions: 
After cutting each board, make the location of all pocket holes and predrill all pocket holes. Once you start assembling the project, it will be difficult to go back and add pocket holes. Remember that you can click images for a larger view.
Step 1: 

Start by building the panels as shown above. Make sure you have also drilled the pocket holes you will need for step 2.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Add the legs with pocket holes. You should use pocket holes set for 3/4" stock here and glue. Use 1 1/4" pocket hole screws. Also attach to the header (you may wish to use a pocket hole set for 1 1/2" stock and 2 1/2" screws for the header, but a 2" nail would work just fine too if you panel pocket hole is at the top).

Step 3 Instructions: 

Drill you siderail pocket holes as shown above, set for 3/4" stock. If you plan to have a adult or large child/teen on the top bunk, you may wish to use brackets here.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Now it's time for the guardrails, which are entirely optional. Begin by drilling one pocket hole on the inside of each of the rails, and one pocket hole on the top of each of the ends. Also drill two pocket holes on the ends of the bottom boards. Then build your rails as shown above. Attach directly to the siderail with bolts with nuts and washers. Carefully place your bolts in a symmetrical fashion.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Attach the cleats directly to the inside of the siderails with 2" screws and glue, placed every 6-8", flush to the bottom of the siderails.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Either use a bunkie board as a mattress support system, or place 1x3s as slats, spaced according to your mattress recommendations. Screw the slats down with 1 1/4" screws. Do not use glue to make the slats removable.

Step 7 Instructions: 

If you wish to add a little extra decoration to the headboards, you can use 1 1/4" finish nails and glue to add 1x2s as shown here.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Collections: 
Skill Level: 

Reclaimed Soda Crate Caddy

Inspired by vintage soda crates, this flatware caddy was made from reclaimed food pallets.  You can make this crate with new boards too.  This easy project features a sturdy handle and four cubbies, suitable for bottles, gardening tools, or even a wedding centerpiece.

Author Notes: 

I've been meaning to tell you where the flatware went after I cleaned out our junk drawer.

With the summer BBQ season just around the corner, I got to thinking wouldn't it be handy if my flatware was in a caddy, that I could put on the table, on our kitchen island, and then outdoors?
So I thought I would borrow a few elements from vintage soda crates, add a handle, and create a decorative, reclaimed wood flatware caddy.
And a chalkboard label.  And then I thought, wow, this would be great in the garden for holding your tools and flowers that you have picked.
Of just as a centerpiece.  Wouldn't this make a pretty, inexpensive centerpiece at a wedding?  
Shopping List: 

General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 
  • 1 - 1x8 @ 9 1/2" (Handle)
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 9 1/2"
  • 4 - 1x6 @ 11"
  • 2 - 1x6 @ 4 3/8"
Cutting Instructions: 
My caddy was made from boards reclaimed from a pallet. The 1x6s measure 5 1/2" wide. Because there is no 1x8s on my pallets, I used a new 1x8 scrap that was quite weathered.
Step 1: 

Cut the handle as shown above from the 1x8. I used a hole saw kit and drilled two 1" holes, and then cutout between the two holes with a jigsaw. For the angled tops, I simply clipped the corners at 45 degrees off square, and then rounded the top edge with the jigsaw.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Next attach the sides to the handle piece. Use glue and 2" finish nails (nailer would make this go so fast).

Step 3 Instructions: 

Attach the remaining sides in the same method.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Now the bottom. Just tack on with finish nails and glue.

Step 5 Instructions: 

And finally the dividers. Apply glue to the cut ends of the dividers and slide in place. Make sure they fit snug. Then attach from the outside and underside. This should be more than enough to keep the dividers in place.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Collections: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Harriet Higher Chair

Is your child to old for a high chair, too young for a standard chair, and just the right size for a big phonebook that no one keeps around anymore?  For the cost of a cheapo plastic booster seat, you can build your child a modern higher chair.  This simple sturdy plan is easy to build, features a foot rest and is easy for youngsters to climb up on.  This chair is not meant to replace a high chair, and does not offer the security and safety of a high chair.

How to build a junior chair preschooler child
Author Notes: 

My only coworker has been complaining quite a bit about her office chair, so I thought it was time to show some appreciation for my number one associate and build her a chair.  She of course, had to help.

Mom, how and I supposed to work if you keep making me take pictures?
This chair is shown with a standard height table (my Big Ur Table if you are looking for plans).  This chair is perfect for preschoolers, who don't need the security of a high chair, but still could use an extra boost.  For sure a luxury if you had to buy such a chair, but in our DIY world where all things are possible on the smallest of budgets, why buy a plastic booster seat when you can make a mod style solid wood chair for the same cost?  And this chair is really cool because the base supports act as a step up, so children can seat themselves at the table.
This chair is of course a modified version of our Harriet Chair.  
But before we get to the plans, I wanted to take a minute to share with you an amazing amazing amazing resource for finishing furniture projects.  I will be the first to admit that building is the easy part, and finishing can be so challenging.  And I often find that even the most discouraging projects can become the most beautiful with the right finish.
But it's always been a challenge for me to supply the best possible information on finishes.  Building has always been my focus, and I still get nervous every time I pull out a paint brush, despite painting hundreds of pieces of furniture.  
When my friend Shaunna, an expert on finishing furniture, mentioned that she was writing an ebook about finishing, I couldn't wait to read it.  But when I finally did, I was blown away by the photos, the videos, the details, and most of all the furniture and the finishes.  
I've learned so much from this book, and was delighted to find even a section just for us!  So if you get a chance, I hope you take a second to check out Shaunna's ebook, Creating Your Masterpiece.
Here are just a few of the photos of the finishes and techniques Shaunna goes through in the Creating Your Masterpiece.
And Shaunna even made this table modified from our plans and finished it.  Love the shelf!
And one more photo.  You can find Creating Your Masterpiece here.

And now, if I haven't lost you, the plans!
Shopping List: 

2 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long

1 - 1x12 @ 15" long
1 - 1x6 @ 15" long
2 inch screws
2 1/2 inch screws
2 1/2 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
wood filler
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
compound miter saw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
This chair is child sized, for an adult sized table. Could be modified to an bar stool with modifications to height and depth
Cut List: 

2 - 2x2 @ 8 1/4" - one end at 10 degrees off square, shortest point

2 - 2x2 @ 10 1/16" - one end at 10 degrees off square, shortest point
2 - 2x2 @ 21 5/16" - both ends at 10 degrees off square, parallel to each other
2- 2x2 @ 21" (Front Legs)
2 - 2x2 @ 12" (Front Support/Apron)
1 - 1x12 @ 15" (Seat)
2 - 2x2 @ 19" (Back Supports)
1 - 2x2 @ 9" (Back Base)
1 - 1x6 @ 15" (Backrest)
Step 1: 

Begin by building two of the above pieces. Make sure both match exactly. Use with either 2 1/2" screws countersunk and glue or 2 1/2" pocket hole screws.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Join the two sides with the front apron/support as shown above. Use the same screws and glue.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Now the top. This time you will need to use 2" screws so the screws don't poke through the seat. Also screw the side aprons to the seat.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Now build the back. Go back to the 2 1/2" fasteners. Adjust for square.

Step 5 Instructions: 

And then attach the seat support to the backrest with 2" screws countersunk and glue. Make sure that this is very square. Mine is actually slightly crooked and it BUGS me.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Finally, adjust the seat rest to fit in the seat back. Measure, use a level at the top, and screw in place. I actually sat my daughter in the chair to get the support just right.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

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