Small Easy Rustic X Bench

Make this bench! Free step by step plans from Ana-White.com!

Author Notes: 

Hey everyone!!!! 

This bench is one of my all time fav projects - so I made a video too!  Check it out:

Shopping List: 

1 – 2×2 @ 8 feet long
2 – 1×3 @ 8 feet long
1 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long
1 – 1×4 @ 8 feet long
1 – 1×12 @ 30″ long
2″ and 2 1/2″ screws or pocket hole screws
glue, wood filler, 120 grit sandpaper and finishing supplies

This list has been updated per our reader comments.

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
compound miter saw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 

4 – 2×2 @ 17 1/4″, end cut parallel to each other at a 5 degree angle off square and a 5 degree bevel
2 – 1×3 @ 7″ (both ends cut 5 degrees off square, NOT parallel to each other, short point to short point)
2 – 1×3 @ 9 1/4″ (Both ends cut at 5 degrees off square, NOT parallel to each other, short point to short point)
2 – 1×3 @ 24″ (both ends cut at 5 degrees off square, NOT parallel to each other, short point to short point)
2 – 1×2 @ 48″ (approximate, just cut your 1×2 in half)
1 – 1×12 @ 30″ (Top)

This list has been updated per reader comments.

Step 1: 

Cut the Legs

Just like yesterday’s Simple Stool Plan, you will need to cut your legs at a double bevel. I highly recommend a compound miter saw set at 5 degrees angle (this would be like rotating your saw so that it makes a pizza shaped cut) and a five degree bevel (this would be like cutting carrots, with the knife blade cutting at an angle away from your hand as you cut diagonal strips) at the same time. The legs are the ONLY pieces that need to be cut at a double bevel. The legs need to be cut at 5 degrees off square (angle) and a 5 degree bevel, 17 1/4″ to 17 1/4″, with the ends parallel to each other (so you would make your first cut, slide your board down 17 1/4″ and make a second cut to have your first leg. Then simply slide your board down and make a third cut to have two legs. Then slide the board again and so on until all four legs are cut. Line your legs us as shown above, and mark the inside corner. This is very important, as with such a slight angle, it will be easy (I’ve done it many times) to get confused as to what direction your legs should be placed at.

Step 2 Instructions: 

End Apron and Base

Okay, start by marking the placement of the end boards as shown above. Predrill your holes (I used pocket holes, but you could use countersunk screws and glue). Center the boards on the legs and attach. The boards should be parallel to the ground, not in line with the legs. The top is flush with the top. You will need to make two of these. Remember the placement of the mark on the top of the leg. End pieces are cut at 5 degrees off square, ends NOT parallel to each other, measurement given is short point to short point.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Side Aprons

Attach the side aprons to the ends as shown above, same as above. The top aprons are cut at 5 degrees of square, ends NOT parallel to each other, measurement given is short point to short point.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Cutting Cross Supports

I wanted to do this step so that you could make your bench longer without trouble. And also, I understand that if you just slightly moved your aprons in or out, it would change your measurements and angles for the cross support. So good old common sense is going to help us out today. Mark the centers of the top and bottom aprons. Flip the bench over. Grab one of the 1x2s cut at 48″ and rest it on the bottom of the top apron and the bottom of the opposite side base board. Use a square or scrap wood piece to mark the angle of the apron and side base board onto the 1×2 as shown in the diagram above. Cut these marks as shown above. Fit, (see fit below) cut again, and fit until you are happy with the fit. You will need to cut two of these. The top and bottom angles ARE NOT THE SAME so you will need to pay attention to the rotation of your cross supports.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Attaching Cross Supports

The cross supports will sit on each side of the center points that you marked in the previous step. They will overlap in the center and are flush to the bottom of the side base boards. Screw and glue.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Top

Mark the underside of the top 1 1/2″ in from both ends. Attach to the top (I knew I was painting so I just used 2″ screws through the top) with screws and glue. The side overhangs should be approximately 1/2″ (depends on your 1×12 width).

Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Simplest Stool

A very simple stool that can also be used as a end table. Try a round top for a more comfortable stool.

I cannot believe we don't already have this stool as a plan.  It's so simple, and if you have a 1x12 scrap, can be just a few dollars to make.  If you prefer a rounded top, I noticed at both Lowes and Home Depot 3/4 plywood 12" rounds were just $6.  Of course you could just cut your own too.

This stool is really cute and sturdy, but I could also see it used as an occasional table.  So if you have a miter saw that double bevels, and a 2x2 and 2 1x2s, you can build this stool in probably about a half hour.  But I'm so glad to be publishing a tutorial, because there are a few tricks that I will be passing along to you.

Shopping List: 

1 – 2×2 @ 8 feet long
1 – 1×2 @ 10 feet long
1 – 1×12 @ 11 1/2″ long or 12″ plywood round, 3/4″ thick
2 1/2″ screws (for countersinking) or 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws
Wood glue, wood filler, sandpaper and finishing supplies

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
compound miter saw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above. Stool is suitable for counter height (NOT bar height) use.
Cut List: 

4 – 2×2 @ 23 1/4″ long, ends cut at a 5 degree angle AND a 5 degree bevel
4 – 1×2 @ 7″, short point to short point, ends cut at a 5 degree angle NOT parallel to each other
2 – 1×2 @ 10″ short point to short point, ends cut at a 5 degree angle NOT parallel to each other
2 – 1×2 @ 8 1/4″ short point to short point, ends cut at a 5 degree angle NOT parallel to each other
2 – 1×2 @ 9 1/2″ short point to short point, ends cut at a 5 degree angle NOT parallel to each other
2 – 1×2 @ 8″ short point to short point, ends cut at a 5 degree angle NOT parallel to each other
1 – 1×12 @ 11 1/2″ (cut to make a square, so measure the width of your 1×12)

Cutting Instructions: 
To cut the legs, set you saw at a 5 degree angle and a 5 degree bevel. Trim off the end of the 2×2 as close to the end as you can. Then measure 23 1/4″ along the same edge and make a cut. You’ve got one leg. Continue simply sliding the board down and making more cuts (using the last boards cut as your first cut) until you have four legs. You should be able to get all four cuts out of one eight foot long 2×2. For the supports and rungs, all ends are cut at a 5 degree angle, NO BEVEL. Also unlike the legs, the ends will NOT be parallel to each other. Simply make a five degree cut, flip your board over by simply rotating it 180 degrees as you would rotate a rolling pin and measure the cut, short point to short point. Make another 5 degree cut.
Step 1: 

Mark Legs

Because the angle on the legs is only five degrees and is a double bevel, it is easy to loose track of the correct position of your legs. Stand your legs up as shown above, and mark the inside corners. Always remember that these corners will be to the inside of the leg.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Top Supports

You will need to build two of the above legs sets, as shown above.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Additional Rungs

Add the additional rungs as shown above. Don’t forget the glue.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Top Supports

Attach the remaining top supports to join the two leg frames as shown above.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Additional Rungs

This step should be as easy as just adding the additional rungs. But I found my stool getting seriously crooked and making me wonder . . . where did I get off so bad? What was happening is the stool was simply getting off square. So have someone hold the stool down so that the four legs are resting squarely on the work surface (NO WOBBLE) and attach the rungs with the stool held square.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Top

Attach the top as shown above. I screwed through the top supports into the underside of the top to hide screw holes.

Finish Used: 
Fill holes with wood filler and let dry. Add another coat if necessary. Sand with 120 grit sandpaper (Recommended – round the top edges until the seat is comfortable to sit on) and vacuum and wipe clean. Paint (turn upside down and paint the underside first, then flip over and paint the top side) or stain as desired.
Estimated Cost: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Farmhouse Bedside Table

A bedside table to match our Farmhouse Beds. Features one large bottom shelf and one large drawer.

Have you ever found yourself lingering in front of your projects, admiring all your hard work, still in disbelief that you actually made it?  That's me today on my new bedside table.

It's sadness that I was unable to convey the beauty of this piece fully in a poorly lit Alaska winter photo.  I truly wish we were neighbors, so you could come over, and barely get a hello out before I'm dragging you in to see my latest creation, my Farmhouse Bedside Table.

But what I would be most proud of is the super smooth sliding drawers.  Only my friends that know me from my blog could understand the satisfaction and pride in something as simple as a smooth sliding drawer in a handmade nightstand.  I did some thinking, some testing, so redoing, and I'm so proud today to show you a different method to drawers.

Shopping List: 

1 – 1×12 @ 6 feet long
2 – 1×6 @ 8 feet long
4 – 2×2 @ 8 feet long
2 – 1×2 @ 8 feet long
1/4″ plywood scrap, at least 24″ x 8″ (minimum, ideally 26″ x 8 1/2″)
2 1/2″ Screws or Pocket Hole Screws
1 1/4″ Finish nails or Screws
Wood Glue, wood filler and finishing supplies
2 Knobs

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 

2 – 1×12 @ 8 3/4″ (Sides)
2 – 1×2 @ 11 1/2″ (Side Trim – needs to be width of your 1x12s)
4 – 2×2 @ 26 1/4″ (Legs)
2 – 2×2 @ 11 1/2″ (Side Stretchers, same width as your 1x12s)
6 – 2×2 @ 23″ (Front/Back Trim)
1 – 1/4″ Plywood or paneling or other sheet goods @ 26″ x 8 1/2″ (back, optional)
3 – 1×2 @ 11 1/2″ (Top Supports)
3 – 1×6 @ 28″ (Top)
2 – 1×6 @ 22 3/4″ (Front and Back of Drawer)
2 – 1×6 @ 11 1/2″ (Width of 1×12 – Sides of Drawers)
1 – 1×12 @ 21 1/4″ (Bottom of drawer)
1 – 1×12 @ 26″ (Bottom Shelf)
2 – 1×2 @ 23″ (Bottom Shelf Trim)

Step 1: 

Sides

Build the sides by screwing or nailing from the insides into the back sides of the 1×2 trim, as shown above. Remember that the 1x2s are on the outside, so hide your fasteners on the back side. Use glue. Make sure trim is flush on top and ends with the 1×12. You will need to build two of these.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Legs

Next add the legs to the project as shown above. Predrill holes and use glue and 2 1/2″ screws. Finish with the bottom stretcher. You will need to do this on both sides.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Front/Back Trim

Join the two side pieces with the front and back trim as shown above. Use 2 1/2″ screws and glue.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Back

This could even be a stiff cardboard or hardboard if that’s what you have on hand. Try asking at your hardware store for a scrap piece of plywood or a damaged sheet to save extra money. Tack on with either 1 1/4″ finish nails or screws and glue.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Top Supports

Attach the top supports as shown above with 2 1/2″ screws and glue.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Top

The top needs to overhang the base by 1″ on all sides. If you have a pocket hole system, build your top, then screw the base to the top through the supports. Otherwise, screw the supports to the top, starting with the middle top board, and minimizing gaps between the boards as you screw the outer boards to the supports.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Drawer

Build your drawer as shown above. Use screws and glue. The bottom is inset, with all sides screwed into the bottom. The front is merely false cuts made with a circular saw with the saw blade set at 1/8″.

Step 8 Instructions: 

Drawer Slides

What I would start with is screwing the drawer slides in place, flush with the bottom of the sides. Then fit the drawer in and unscrew the drawer slide and adjust until the gap around the top and sides is even and the drawer slides in and out nicely.

Step 9 Instructions: 

Front Trim

Attach the front trim to the legs as shown above, leaving an even gap on the underside of the drawer.

Step 10 Instructions: 

Bottom Shelf

You can lay the bottom shelf on the side stretchers, or you can screw to the legs as shown above.

Preparation Instructions: 
For a stained finish, be very careful to not let glue dry on any exposed seams or areas. Sand and stain, followed with wood filler that matches the stain, followed with a light sanding, a second coat of stain, and a clear top coat.
Estimated Cost: 
Room: 
Collections: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

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