Media Hutch for the Turned Leg Media Console

PDF versionPDF version
Dimensions: 
Dimensions for the hutch. 49″ wide, 47″ tall, 13″ deep
Dimensions: 

2 – 8 foot 1×12 Boards
4 – 8 foot 1×2 Boards
1 – 8 foot 1×4 Board
1/2 sheet of 1/4″ plywood
2″ screws or 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws
2″ finish nails
1″ finish nails
wood filler
wood glue
Paint and Finishing Supplies
Tip Resistant Kit

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Cut List: 

3 – 1×12 @ 46″ (Sides)
1 – 1×12 @ 44 1/2″ (Shelf)
1 – 1×4 @ 44 1/2″ (Bottom Support)
1 – 1/4″ plywood or paneling @ 46″ x 46 3/4″ (Back)
1 – 1×4 @ 46″ (Header)
2 – 1×2 @ 43 1/4″ (Sides)
1 – 1×2 @ 43″ (Shelf Trim)
1 – 1×2 @ 47 1/2″ (Bottom Crown, Front)
4 – 1×2 @ 12 1/4″ (Crown, Sides)
1 – 1×2 @ 49″ (Top Crown, Front)

Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 
Style: 

Step 1

Box

Build your box as shown in the diagram out of 1x12s. Note, you can use a different width board (ie 1×10 or 1×8) if your TV is slimmer and will take up less space. Use either pocket holes or 2″ screws and glue. Adjust for square.

You can also adjust the height of the shelf to fit your specific TV size.

Step 2

Base Support

After you have your box built, add a support (1×4) to the back as shown in the diagram to give you something to nail your plywood to and keep the back in line. Use pocket holes from the back or 2″ screws predrilled from the outsides and glue.

Summary: 

A media hutch for the turned leg media console. Features simple styling, large top shelf.

Step 3

Back

Tack the back on with finish nails and glue. One thing to note – when you nail into the bottom support, use 1″ nails and glue to keep from poking your nails through. Make sure you attach to the shelf to to make that shelf stronger. Make sure everything is very square – the back plywood will set everything and it will be hard to readjust after the glue dries. Possibly impossible.

Step 4

Header

Header. Attach the header to the front with 2″ finish nails and glue.

Step 5

Side Trim
Trim out the sides with 2″ finish nails and glue.

Step 6

Shelf Trim
Now the shelf. Same thing, finish nails and glue.

Step 7

Bottom Crown
There are any number of ways that you can do crown. This is just the cheapest and easiest way. Attach 1x2s around the top, 3/4″ from the top, with finish nails and glue. Use the 1″ (or 1 1/4″ if you have them) nails here.

Step 8

Top Crown
Then add the top. Use 2″ finish nails through the face of the tops into the shelf. Do not forget the glue. It will hold everything in place.

Step 9

Step 9 Instructions: 

Safety

Hutches should be secured to the wall behind with a tip resistant kit to keep from tipping forward.

Finishing Instructions

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill your holes with wood filler and let dry. Sand with 120 grit sandpaper. Clean your project with a vacuum and a damp cloth. Prime and paint or stain as desired.

My TV sits on the Turned Leg Media Console and makes your flat panel pretty!

media hutch plans diy pottery barn
My TV sits on the Turned Leg Media Console and I absolutely love it!  One of our readers asked for the matching hutch, so here goes!  The hutch makes your flat panel pretty!

General Store Cubbies

PDF versionPDF version
Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Dimensions: 

5 – 1×3 Pine Boards, 8 foot length
3 – 1×12 Pine Boards, 8 foot length
2″ Screws
2″ Finish Nails
Wood Glue and Finishing Supplies

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
hammer
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
nailer
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Cut List: 

5 – 1×3 @ 42″ (Shelf Trim)
4 – 1×12 @ 16 7/8″(Cubby Dividers)
3 – 1×12 @ 40 1/2″ (Shelves)
2 – 1×12 @ 36″ (Sides)

Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 
Style: 

Step 1

Start by building the box as shown in the diagram above. Use 2″ screws and glue or pocket hole screws.

Step 2

Add the cubby dividers. How I would do this is put the bottom dividers in fixed first. Then put the top dividers in, but you wont’ be able to fasten the bottom of the top dividers to the middle shelf. Don’t despair. Glue and let dry in place. I’ve got you covered

Summary: 

These simple General Store Cubbies are easy to build and feature six cubbies, each with front lips to keep contents in place. Special thanks to our readers for sharing their photos.

Step 3

Use the trim boards to nail the bottom boards in place. Make sure you also nail the trim boards to the shelf and the sides. Add trim boards to the back. IMPORTANT: Adjust for square before attaching these boards, especially if you are stacking multiple cubbies.

I'm using our new easy plan submission for to submit this plan that I designed and showed you how to design here. . This plan is inspired by Pottery Barn's Mitchell wall system, and looks so simple in the plan, but there's so much pottential. Think stacking like they did in General Stores. I'm suddenly wanting a wall full in distressed washed blue . . . You can see what Pottery Barn's does with their Mitchell storage cubbies here.

general store pottery barn mitchell cubby shelf 1
I'm using our new easy plan submission form to submit this plan that I designed and showed you how to design here. . This plan is inspired by Pottery Barn's Mitchell wall system, and looks so simple in the plan, but there's so much pottential. Think stacking like they did in General Stores. I'm suddenly wanting a wall full in distressed washed blue . . . You can see what Pottery Barn's does with their Mitchell storage cubbies here.

You can submit plans too!  Just go here and follow the instructions.

Another thought . . . if you were to make the trim on the shelves wider, than you could use it as cubbies in a kids room.  You know the kind . . . the kind that holds balls and kids can clean their own rooms with?  The ledge would keep everything from spilling out!

Shoe Dresser

PDF versionPDF version
Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Dimensions: 

4 – 1×8, 8 foot length
2 – 1×6, 8 foot length
scrap 2x2s for the feet
3 – 1×2, 8 foot length
4 – 3/8″ wood dowel pins, 1 1/2″ long or two sets of traditional hinges
2″ screws or 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws
1 1/4″ Screws
2″ Finish nails
wood glue
4 magnetic cabinet clasps
knobs or pulls
A used fabric belt or strap
Finishing Supplies

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
hammer
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
jigsaw
sander
level
countersink drill bit
Cut List: 

4 – 1x8s @ 47″ Door Faces (measurements differ from diagrams to conserve boards)
1 – 1×8 @ 47 1/4″ Middle Shelf (measurements differ from diagram to conserve boards)
2 – 1x8s @ 48 3/4″ (Top and Bottom (measurements differ from diagram to conserve boards)
2 – 1x8s @ APPROXIMATELY 31″ (See step 2) Sides
2 – 1×6 @ 47″ (Bin Bottom) (measurement differs from diagram to conserve boards)
6 – 1×6 @ 14″ (Approximate)
4 – 1×2 @ 47″ (Bin Backs)
1 – 1×2 @ 47 1/4″ (Cleat)
2- 2×2 @ Your Base Board + 1″ (Legs)
1 – 1×2 @ 44 3/4″ (Front Apron)
2 – 1×2 @ 5″ (Side Aprons)

Project Type: 
Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 
Style: 
General Instructions: 

I have marked this one Advanced not because it is difficult to build, but because it could be easy to mess up. Please don’t tackle this as a first project.

Step 1

Door Faces

Cut your door faces. If you have a Kreg Jig™, attach door faces to make two doors. If not, that’s okay, I got you covered in the next step. Measure the overall height of the doors and take note of this. 1x8s differ from mill to mill, so be aware and build according to your board widths.

Step 2

Bins

Start by attaching the 1×6 to the bottom of the doors as shown above with 2″ screws or pocket hole screws. Use glue. Then cut your bin dividers according to the height of your doors and round corners off. Attach in place. If you did not build your door faces in step 1, you can use finish nails and glue to attach the door faces to the dividers. You can use more dividers to add more support for the door faces (and more division of your shoe storage).

Summary: 

A narrow tilt out shoe storage unit that looks like a console table, acts like an entire shoe closet!

Special thanks to Niki for sharing her photo.

Step 3

Bin Backs

You need something to keep the shoes from tipping out. How about a couple of 1x2s? Screw and glue in place.

Step 4

Box

The box needs to be build around your bins, with a 1/8″ gap around the door faces. We’ve aleady accounted for the gaps on the sides of the doors, but not the top and bottom. As shown in the diagram, figure the exact measurement of the sides and cut. Build your box.

Step 5

Cleat

Attach the cleat to the top inside of the box. Use screws and glue. This one also helps firm up the top. You will screw through the cleat into the wall to secure the shoe dresser in it’s final home.

Step 6

Dowels

Now this is the tricky part. Not so much trick to do but trick for me to explain. Clamp the bins centered in their box, with a 1/8″ gap around all sides. If you don’t have clamps, 1 1/4″ screws could do the trick from the inside of the bins. Drill a 3/8″ hole at the bottommost front corner of your bins, careful to make sure the hole drills into the bins and does not miss the bins. The hole needs to be the depth of your wood dowels. Insert the dowels and test the bins out. Alternatively, you can use traditional hinges.

Step 7

Footer

Attach the footer to the bottom as shown above.

Step 8

The Used Belt

Have someone give you a hand, because this one is tricky to handle here. There’s only two front legs and the bins keep flopping open . . . I know Tilt the bin out to the desired max opening. Cut a piece of the belt to and screw it to the bin and the shelf below the bin. Make two straps per bin.

Step 9

Step 9 Instructions: 

Assembly

Keep the bins shut using the magnetic clasps. I used them on the sides for a nice tight fit. Screw the cleat to a stud in the wall behind the shoe dresser to keep it in place and to keep it from falling forward when the bins open.

The boots are still there, but the shoes are gone.

It was indeed odd, seeing our Alaska entryway free of shoes and outfitted with a green dresser.

Mom, where are my Uggs?  In the dresser, honey.

Hey, that's not a dresser!

That's a shoe bin!

Yes, this is a shoe bin.  And these are the plans for it.

Someone once asked me: Why do women love shoes?   I responded "because they always fit, and when nothing else does, your cute shoes will distract from your jeans not fitting."  Have your dessert, and buy some cute shoes  :)  And build  :)

Modern Mod

If your taste is more on the modern side, save yourself some knobs and cut handles out.

This shoe dresser is designed to work with tight hallways and tons of shoes.

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