Wood Drawer Organizers

Building wood drawer dividers for existing drawers can be easy and easily customized for your drawers. With this simple plan, you can divide and conquer even the messiest of Junk Drawers.

Author Notes: 

Welcome, welcome, welcome to our dream home.

And thank you for your patience and understanding with the site as we've made this move.  I know that there have been many issues, and I'm sure there will still be some bugs that need to be worked out, and I appreciate so much that you are working with me on this, and share my vision for less browsing, more building. 
Please, shoot me an email if you have a site suggestion.  I can't promise to answer every email, or take every recommendation, but I do read and make decisions based on your feedback.  Thank you to those of you who have already submitted feedback.
I also appreciate everyone's patience with me as I focused my time toward building the site instead of building projects, and have not been able to post as often as usual. I cannot wait to get back to building and building more!
It isn't just my posts that have been neglected in this past month.  As I look around my home, swear the scale is broken (true story - I went over to the neighbors today to weigh myself because I was certain our scale was broken . . . and it's not) and try to figure out which room to start on first, it's not in dismay.  I actually feel oddly accomplished at the chaos.
Have you been here?  You've been up all day (and probably all night too), haven't sat for a second, you cooked, cleaned, paid bills, did laundry, cooked again, did the dishes yet again . . . and then your husband comes home and looks around the still messy house and says "Sooooo . . . what did you do today?"  
The most difficult part of being a homemaker for me has always been feeling like no matter what I do, how hard I work, I am not accomplishing anything.  And some kind person is going to comment that we are raising beautiful children, and what could be more accomplishing than that, and they are absolutely right.  But on a day to day basis, my biggest struggle has always been seeing that first, and seeing the room I just cleaned get destroyed in five minutes and being okay with picking it all up all over again.
But as I look around at our home in it's current state of disarray, it says to me, Ana, you do matter.  Because look what happens when you are not there to straighten up a bookcase that you think no one will ever notice, do an extra load of laundry, clean the tub.  That little bit of dusting here and there, though never enough, it does matter.  I am making a difference.  
So in an odd way, I find myself encouraged to start getting my home back into order.  And you just gotta start in the kitchen, and I decided to tackle my room of shame.  Rather, drawer of shame.
I still am trying to come to terms with the fact that this very drawer has been this horrible for several YEARS . . . and for about the cost of a cup of coffee, and for about the amount of time it takes to drink that cup of coffee, I could have had this . . .
Especially considering I spent $100 on plastic organizers for the matching drawer . . . and they just don't every stay in place quite right.  $2 and an hour.  Why didn't I do this years ago?
Do you have a junk drawer?  Take this morning and organize it with dividers, and I'm going to show you just how.
Shopping List: 

1 - 1x3 @ 8 feet long

2 inch screws
120 grit sandpaper
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Custom to fit your Drawers
Cut List: 

Cut to fit your drawers

Step 1: 

One thing I learned when designing and developing this website was that you have to think in columns. The junk drawer is no different. First we need to divide it into columns. So take a measurement of the inside depth or your drawers.

That is of course after you have done the most difficult part - clean the drawer out and then remove it from the cabinet.

Step 2 Instructions: 

If you have an extra wide drawer like I do, you may wish to use two dividers. For a narrow drawer, just one divider down the center. First and foremost, consider what you will be storing inside the compartments. Bills? Envelopes? Letter sized paper? Pens and pencils? Take some time to consider as you plan your dividers. Lay the main dividers out as shown above.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Then screw two smaller dividers to each of the long dividers as shown above. Do not make the compartments so small that you cannot reach inside the compartments easily.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Finally, add the center dividers to divide up the center space and to keep the side dividers in place. Use 2" screws and glue.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Replace drawer, replace junk. Give your kids a pep talk about everything having a place, and voila! junk drawer is no longer the room of shame.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Finish Used: 
Because this drawer is going to hold eating utensils, I simple gave the wood a good sanding a a coat of mineral oil to seal it.
Estimated Cost: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Harriet Chair

The Harriet Chair is a simple modern chair that is very sturdy and lightweight, yet easy and inexpensive to build.  

Author Notes: 

Here's the thing about simplicity. Perhaps you are driven to live a simpler life for the same primary reason I am - because life is about things that laugh and talk back, not about things that collect dust and having to dust those things. And I find the simpler my life becomes, the more simple I want it to be. I'm finding myself drawn not just to having a simple amount of things, but also for those things that I do have to be simple.

But one of the things we perhaps don't consider about simplicity is it's impact on the environment. This chair so inspired me, but even more, the text summarizing why using less tools, less boards and simpler techniques - mass produced over thousands of chairs - can have a significant impact on our environment. Think about it - if this post inspires ten thousand chairs to be made, and only required a limited amount of simple cuts, how much energy have we not wasted, as opposed to hand carving a chair back leg with a jigsaw, followed by an hour of belt sanding? And if ten thousand of these chairs are made (hypothetically over years) and there is no waste from chair back legs being cutout in a traditional pattern, how much scrap wood doesn't get thrown in a landfill?

I personally have a great love and appreciation for nature.  And it is my hope that my children and grandchildren can appreciate the resiliency of a moose, be grateful for a good blueberry year, and still be able to buy lumber directly from a mill.  This is not just about today, and living my best life right now.  This is about tomorrow.

While building this chair might cost you ten bucks, consider how much you are saving by building for yourself.  And I'm not just talking about money.

 

And I'll admit, it's a little about loving a pink chair with a modern edge. But regardless of the color

 

 

I've got a thing for navy blue and red too.

 

 

You've made a green(er) chair.

And also a better chair than mine.  I changed the side supports to 2x2s so you won't have to buy a different type of board - and also because it's stronger and more consistent with the rest of the chair.  The back rest hits at that perfect spot on your back, just below your shoulder blades, to give you just the right amount of support.  The chair is very very sturdy and lightweight, with a lower profile for smaller spaces.

Shopping List: 


  • 1 – 3/4″ plywood or pine project panel 24″ x 16″  (for four chairs, simply buy a 16″ wide strip, 8 feet long.  For six chairs, use a 1/2 sheet of plywood)
  • 2 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long
  • 30 – 2 1/2″ Screws
  • 15 – 2″ Screws
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Filler
  • Paint

General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 


  • 2 – 2 x2 @ 13″ (Short point, one end cut at 15 degrees off square)
  • 2 – 2×2 @ 15″ (Short Point, one end cut at 15 degrees off square)
  • 2 – 2×2 @ 17 1/4″ (Front Legs)
  • 2 – 2×2 @ 17 7/8″ (Back legs, both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, parallel to each other)
  • 1 – 2×2 @ 13″ (Front Apron)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Plywood 16″ x 16″
  • 2 – 2×2 @ 20 1/2″ (Back Sides)
  • 1 – 2×2 @ 10″ (Back Bottom)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Plywood @ 16″ x 7 3/4″ (Backrest)

Step 1: 

Sides

Lay out the sides and construct as shown above. Use 2 1/2″ screws and glue. You will need to build two of these. Lay the two sides on top of each other to confirm and adjust to match.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Front Apron

Join the two sides with the front apron. If you want an even sturdier chair (which can equal a chair that lasts longer) add a second support level with the side supports. 2 1/2″ screws and glue.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Seat

Screw the seat down through the 2×2 aprons into the underside of the seat. Use 2″ screws and glue. Make sure your chair is sitting level at this point.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Back

Begin constructing the back as shown here. Use 2 1/2″ screws and glue.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Backrest

Attach the backrest to the back with 2″ screws and glue. Make sure you are keeping everything square here.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Assembly

Attach the backrest to the chair seat as shown above. Use glue and 2 1/2″ screws. The bottom of the chair back should be flush with the side supports.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Grant Secretary Hutch

The secretary piece to the Grant Collection. Features six small drawers and a large shelf. Secretary top folds down for a desk.

Author Notes: 

Shopping List: 


  • 1 x20 Board leftover from base unit
  • 1/4 Sheet of 3/4″ Plywood or MDF (for the hinge out desktop)
  • Scrap 1/4″ plywood leftover from the base unit
  • 1 – 1×12 @ 8 feet long
  • 1 – 1×12 @ 10 feet long
  • 3 – 1×3 @ 8 feet long
  • 1 – stick 3/4″ moulding – 8 feet long  (if they sell these in 7 foot sticks, you can use that too)
  • 2 ” screws or 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws
  • 1 1/4″ and 2″ finish nails
  • wood glue
  • wood filler
  • finishing supplies

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
level
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 


  • 1 – 1×20 @ 46 1/2″ (Bottom)
  • 2 – 1×20 @ 12 3/4″ (Sides)
  • 1 – 1×12 @ 48″ (Top)
  • 1 – 1/4″ Plywood @ 48″ x 13 1/2″
  • 8 – 1×12 @ 10 3/4″ (Shelves)
  • 4 – 1×12 @ 12″ (Sides)
  • 18 – 1×3 @ 10 1/2″ (Drawer Sides and Front)
  • 6 – 1×3 @ 9″ (Drawer Backs)
  • 6 – 1/4″ Plywood @ 10 1/2″ x 11 1/4″ (Drawer Bottoms)
  • 1 – 1×12 @ 22″ (Shelf)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Plywood @ 14″ x 48″

Step 1: 

The base of the Secretary Hutch is a 1×20 @ 46 1/2″ long, or simply a piece of 3/4″ plywood or MDF cut to the size shown above.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Sides and Bottom

Cut the sides out as shown above. 1x12s can vary in width so measure the width of your 1x12s and adjust the cuts as shown above. If you choose to have your 1x12s made from a sheet of 3/4″ plywood ripped into strips, to minimize waste, make your 1x12s 11 1/2″ wide.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Top

Add the top to the hutch as shown above. Use screws and glue, as this piece is not fully face framed. Adjust for square.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Back

Tack the back on to your SQUARE hutch. Use finish nails and glue or screws (you can use short ones).

Step 5 Instructions: 

Drawers Shelf

Build the drawers from 1x12s as shown above. You can use 2″ finish nails and glue for this one. Make two of these guys.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Drawers

Make six of these little drawers. Just build a box from 1x3s as shown above (finish nails and glue would do just fine here) and tack 1/4″ plywood to the bottom. When you go to finish, make sure you sand and fill the edges of the 1/4″ plywood so it appears supper smooth.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Shelf

Insert the two drawer pieces into the hutch and measure and cut your shelf to fit the difference. Should be 22″. You can either make the shelf fixed or drill holes and insert shelf pins according to the instruction on the shelf pin package (shelf pins can vary in size and installation methods). You can also add additional shelves if you like (for example, one shelf for the laptop, one for the keyboard and mouse storage).

Step 8 Instructions: 

Edge Moulding

Cut the edge moulding to fit and nail and glue down, mitering corners at 45 degree angles.

Step 9 Instructions: 

Flip Down Desk

Attach the flip down desk to the desk interior with hinges as shown above. You can use any standard low profile hinge here. Also recommended is hinge supports to keep the desktop open at just the right angle. Install magnetic clasps to keep the hinged top closed when closed on the insides of the sides.

Step 10 Instructions: 

When you assemble the piece, make sure you screw the hutch to the base, as the hutch could tip forward when weight is placed on the flip down top. If you also add the top hutch, make sure you screw down and also use a tip resistant kit to keep the entire project from tipping forward.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Pages