Modern Industrial Concrete Wood Coat Tree

build a coat tree from a 2x4 and a concrete pier block!

Author Notes: 

Hi everyone!

I've been keeping a big secret from you (unless you are one of the awesome folks that follows me on Instagram ).  

We started on a new project!!!

I can't quite share with you just yet ..... but let me just say this,  Man, the bugs are bad this year!

Anyway, we ended up with a leftover pier block in the yard ...

Toliy's been wanting to make a industrial style coat tree, but one that doesn't cost a zillion dollars in pipe fittings .... sooooo

He found a scrap 2x4 and marked where the bracket holes are on the pier block,

And drilled a hole through the 2x4.

Since it's important to get the hole drilled straight through, he used a block of wood to help him eyeball drilling (unless you have a drill press handy, this works pretty good).

Either that, or you are the Ram himself, and you don't need a guide.

Then he attached the 2x4 to the pier block with a bolt and nuts and washers.

Then decided to use more bolts for the hooks.

Once placement of the bolts was determined, Toliy drilled holes through the 2x4 and installed the hook bolts.

Don't you love a project that you can make for free from just stuff you have laying around?  Especially a project that is so useful and quick to build!

And I love the texture of the concrete brought inside.  

Your turn!!!

We'd love to see what twist you put on this coat tree - maybe use a 4x4 post?  Or pour the 2x4 in a bucket of concrete?  Or use an actually tree?

Please share if you DIY!

XO Ana + Family

PS - Any wild tips on taming Alaska mosquitos?

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CPU Base Cabinet for Desk featured on HGTV Saving Alaska

build your own desk with simple cpu base cabinet plans from ana-white.com

Author Notes: 

Well, we haven't heard back yet from HGTV ..... but we are still hoping that they pick up our pilots for a full season.  Thank you so much for your support, and I'll be sure to let you know as soon as I can any updates.

One of the first projects that I took on for the second episode of Saving Alaska was Aaron's room.

Up here in Alaska, where heating bills are high, homes tend to be smaller - especially in the cold interior of Alaska.  Aaron's room was very small - about 9 feet wide x 8 feet long.  He really wanted a desk in his room that could hold a CPU base.

So we built a loft bed, and the desk underneath.

Just like that, twice the room size!

I loved how this desk system turned out!!!  So much storage, so practical, very stylish, but simple to build!

I'm sharing the plans for the CPU base below - will follow up with the rest of the plans in this room soon!

XO - Ana + Family

Shopping List: 

10 feet of 3/4" plywood, 15-3/4" wide (about 1/2 a sheet)
1 - 1x4 @ 10 feet long
1 - 1x2 @ 6 feet long
1 - 1x6 @ 2 feet long
1/4" plywood for back is optional
16" bottom corner mount euro style drawer slides (white)
knob or handle

1 1/4 inch finish nails
1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
nailer
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Short enough to add desktop on top
Cut List: 

2 - 3/4" plywood @ 15-3/4" x 29-1/4" (sides)
2 - 1x4 @ 19-1/2" (bottom footers)
1 - 3/4" plywood @ 15-3/4" x 19-1/2" (shelf)
1 - 3/4" plywood @ 15-3/4" x 17-3/4" (divider)
2 - 3/4" plywood @ 15-3/4" x 9-1/4" (cubby shelf)
4 - 1x2 @ 19-1/2"

DRAWER
2 - 1x4 @ 16" (drawer sides)
2 - 1x4 @ 17" (drawer front/back)
1 - 1/4" plywood @ 18-1/2" x 16" (bottom)
1- 1x6 @ 19-1/4" (drawer face)

Cutting Instructions: 
Rip 3/4" plywood into strips 15-3/4" wide the long way. From these strips, cut all 15-3/4" wide pieces by cross cutting.
Step 1: 

Attach sides to bottom footer pieces. We used 3/4" pocket holes and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws hidden on the inside.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Set bottom shelf on footer pieces and attach. We used pocket holes again, but also attached to the footer pieces with 1-1/4" finish nails and glue.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Build the divider piece separately (we again used pocket holes) and position inside cabinet. Then attach to side with glue and finish nails.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Attach 1x2s to upper portion of cabinet - we again used pocket holes.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Measure opening for the drawer and build drawer to fit your opening and drawer slides. Our drawer slides required 1" overall clearance so we built our drawer as shown above.

Plywood is just nailed and glued to bottom.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Install drawer into base with drawer slide, keeping a 3/4" space to front to allow for drawer face.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Attach drawer face to drawer with 1-1/4" finish nails and glue. Also add a few 1-1/4" screws (we just used pocket hole screws) to ensure drawer face doesn't come off.

TIP: You may wish to install handle/knob before attaching to drawer face.

For the top, we used an 1" thick pine panel piece that spanned the entire length of the room, screwed through the 1x2s in the base.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
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Double Trestle Outdoor Table

diy outdoor double wide table - plans from ana-white.com

Author Notes: 

Happy Friday!!!

I'm delighted to share a new plan with you today!

Jaime from That's My Letter and I collaborated on this oh-so-massive outdoor dining table!

Seating now less than 10 adults!!!

Of course, plans follow - but please, stop over and check out lots more photos, step-by-step building pics over at Jaime's blog, That's My Letter.

Thanks Jaime!

XO Ana + Family

Shopping List: 

19 - 2x6x8
6 - 1x6x8
4 - 2x4x8
2- 4x4x8
2 - 1x3x6 (for added support - see Jaime's post)
2" and 2-1/2" exterior screws
2-1/2" pocket hole screws

Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
jigsaw
compound miter saw
staple gun
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions shown above
Cut List: 

LEGS
6 - 4x4 @ 23"
2 - 1x6 @ 58"
2 - 1x6 @ 60"
2 - 2x4 @ 60" - shortest point measurement - both ends BEVELED at 45 degrees off square, ends NOT parallel
2 - 2x4 @ 63" CUT TO FIT! - shortest point measurement - both ends BEVELED at 30 degrees off square, ends NOT parallel
2 - 2x4 @ 64-7/8" CUT TO FIT! - shortest point measurement - both ends BEVELED at 15 degrees off square, ends NOT parallel
8 - 2x4 @ 16-3/4" - both ends cut at 45 degrees off square, ends ARE parallel to each other, long point to short point measurement

2 - 2x4 @ 55-1/2" (stretchers)
2 - 2x6 @ 64-1/2"
3 - 2x6 @ 48"
2 - 1x6 @ 66"

Tabletop boards are 90" long - use less for spacing in between

Step 1: 

Attach three of the posts to the 1x6 end apron and the 1x6 for the bottom. Screws are recommended - use exterior screws for outdoor application. Predrill holes to prevent splitting.

Screws must be at least 2" long but could be longer if you want to use the same screws as the rest of the assembly.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Attach base to the first 2x4 board (ends cut at 45 degrees). To hide screws, attach from underside. 2" screws and glue are recommended here.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Attach next layer of 2x4 under the previous 2x4. Measure and cut to ensure perfect fit. Use 2-1/2" screws here.

Step 4 Instructions: 

Add the final bottom 2x4 same as the previous one.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Attach cross bracing with 2" screws to the outer end apron. Then attach to legs with 2-1/2" screws.

Repeat to build two ends.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Attach stretchers to base.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Use 2-1/2" screws to attach aprons to legs. Then attach joist to the 2x6 aprons. You'll need these for attaching the tabletop board to.

Step 8 Instructions: 

Attach outer aprons to the outsides of the 4x4 legs. Use 2" screws and glue.

Step 9 Instructions: 

Attach tabletop boards to joists and legs with 2-1/2" screws.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
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