Outdoor Sofa from 2x4s for RYOBI Nation

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UPDATE: Congrats to Paula for winning this giveaway! Thank you to all who entered!!!

Happy Friday!!!

It's not too late to entertain outdoors with a wood sofa!!!

Especially one this easy to build!

Those are just 2x4s, and it IS this simple to build:

Like one of the simplest big projects ever!!!!

I made this sofa and plans with the help of our awesome friends over at RYOBI, and you can download all the steps, cut list and more here.

We also thought it would be fun to giveaway some of the tools that I used to build this sofa!

All you have to do is click here to enter!

Have a great weekend!  

Happy lounging!

XO Ana+Family

Project Type: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 

Step 1

Summary: 

build an outdoor sofa out of 2x4s! modern style meets diy chic from ana-white.com

Stackable Fruit and Veggie Crates

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These
stackable fruit and veggie crates were simple, simple, simple. 

And oh
so cute! 

I love that they stack.

I love that they are wood (there's reasons why produce is crated in wood!)

And did I mention like $3 to build each crate????  

To begin with, I went ahead and made all of my cuts using the compound
miter saw.

 

There's quite a bit of cutting in this project, so having a easy way to cut helps save a ton of time.

With everything cut, I started building by making the two ends. I used the Kreg Jig and screws since this is the
main support piece. Produce can get heavy!

 

 

I just attached the bottom supports to the two legs.

After that I attached the two legs together with some end slats. 

 

Just nail and glue to legs - I used 3/4" nails.

I did the same for both shorter sides.

 

And then I did the same for the longer sides.

For the bottom slats, you just need to set them inside the crate. This
creates nice air flow to keep your fruits and veggies longer. 

 

It also allows for easy clean up should your apples go sour on you.

I built two of these just the same. 

No finish required, since I wanted the wood to be food safe (you could add an oil finish used for cutting boards, like boiled linseed oil).

I just gave them a good sanding. 

 Then came the moment of truth.  Will they stack?

 

They fit together perfectly! TIP: If you have trouble with them stacking, consider sanding the legs down.

I couldn't wait to fill them with beautiful fruits and veggies!

For some added charm I decided to make chalk labels.

I cut small pieces of plywood and sprayed them with Rustoleum Chalk Paint, glued and
nailed ( I recommend 1/2" nails) them onto the fronts and it was done!

 

Cute, isn't it!?!

 

Now it's your turn - make your own with the free plans following!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions shown above
Dimensions: 

1 - 1 x 2 x 8
5 - 4' wood lath pieces, usually comes in a bundle of 50
This shopping list is for 1 crate. You will need to multiply by the number of crates you want.

Common Materials: 
3/4 inch finish nails
1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
120 grit sandpaper
Tools: 
measuring tape
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
compound miter saw
nailer
sander
Cut List: 

4 - 1 x 2 @ 6 1/2" Legs
2 - 1 x 2 @ 13 3/4" Bottom supports between legs
6 - Wood Lath Pieces @ 8 3/4" end slats
6 - Wood Lath Pieces @ 15 3/4" side slats, or cut to fit
8 - Wood Lath Pieces @ 8 3/4" inside bottom slats

This is the cut list per crate. Depending on how many stacking crates you want, you need to multiply by that number.

Project Type: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Estimated Cost: 
Style: 
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Step 1

Build legs. Drill pocket holes in the bottom of the longer 1 x 2's on each side. Attach to shorter 1 x 2's (legs) with 1 1/4" PH screws and glue.

Step 2

Attach End Slats with 3/4 inch nails and wood glue. Notice to start 2 1/2" from bottom, which will put the top wood lath slat above the top of the 1 x 2

Summary: 

Stackable Fruit and Veggie Crates - Ana-White.com

Step 3

Attach the side slats the same way 3/4" nails and glue. I cut to fit after have the end slats holding the legs together.

Step 4

Set slats in bottom of crate. No need to glue and nail for easy removal.

Finishing Instructions

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

Haven Turned Leg Coffee Table

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This year, with our son being so young, we decided to limit our travel.  It's always quite a trek for us to go anywhere, since we live 2 hours past the farthest north international airport in the US, up here in Alaska.  

Getting to the east cost is an all day adventure.  Getting to the east coast with a nursing newborn .... I wouldn't wish that on anyone.  

Especially not the other passengers.  

But seeing all the pictures from the Haven Conference this year made me regret not just going for it.  Like sorry 22C.

Particularly these pictures:

That's Jaime from That's My Letter, teaching attendees how to cut boards.

And Jen from House of Wood helping attendees drill pocket holes.

I've done this before - build live in front of an audience - it's tough.  But these ladies are rocking this coffee table!!!

Aren't those legs beautiful?  They were supplied by Osborne Wood.

I love that Jaime and Jen didn't forget those little steps that make such a big deal, like checking to make sure the table is square.

Or the most important things of all - to have fun while building!!!!

Isn't it beautiful?

Now I can't bring the Haven Conference to you, but we are sharing the plans that Jaime and Jen used to build this coffee table below.

Enjoy the plans!

XO Ana + Family

PS - Check out these other coffee tables made by these ladies -

From Jaime from That's My Letter

And from Jen from House of Wood.

Dimensions: 
Dimensions shown above
Dimensions: 

3 - 1x6x8
2 - 1x4x8
4 - turned legs (3 1/2" wide at top)

Common Materials: 
1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
drill
circular saw
Cut List: 

5 - 1x6 @ 48" (top)
2 - 1x4 @ 39" (long side aprons)
2 - 1x4 @ 19" (short side aprons)

Project Type: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Step 1

Build the tabletop first. For more tips on building tabletops check out this post here.

Step 2

Attach end aprons to legs.

TIP: If attaching top with pocket holes in later steps, make sure you drill 3/4" pocket holes facing upward in aprons.

Summary: 

Easy DIY coffee table with turned legs - from Ana-White.com

Step 3

Next, attach the longer aprons to the legs.

TIP: If attaching top with pocket holes in later steps, make sure you drill 3/4" pocket holes facing upward in aprons.

Step 4

Adjust base for square and then attach to underside of tabletop.

Finishing Instructions

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

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