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Queen-size Slat Bed

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About This Project

Meranti (Philippine mahogany)

I needed a new double bed for one of our spare rooms (that had been used for storing suitcases, etc.) and looking at what was available, decided to make my own. 

I settled on standard timber sizes - 4x4, 6x4, 8x1, 4x2, 1x1, etc. and used pocket-hole joinery to tie it all together. 

As far as tools, a drop saw, battery drill and hand router/trimmer, along with measuring/marking/squaring tools.

The bed rails and stretchers are 6x2 Meranti (a local timber in SE Asia where I live), the posts are 4x4s, the support rail in the centre is a 4x2, the head and footboards are finished with 8x1s.

The slat support cleats and centre support rail were rough-sawn, the rest of the timber was planed - my thinking being that no-one would see either of those and I had a bunch of 4x2s lying around.

Very little measuring was done, other than for cutting the lengths of timber - I just cut a piece of timber to act as a spacer to ensure I had the rails and stretchers at an even height and set back from the edge of the 4x4s.

All measuring was done in metric, as that's what I am used to - so the 4x4s are really 100x100 - and after planing, 90x90, but my router bits are imperial, so I decided to use inch measurements in descriptions. The plans are in metric, but if you want them in inch, just change the 'model' to inch.

The 4x4s had a 1/4" groove 7/8" deep routed in to take a matching 'tongue' routed into the boards, which were glued in place. one 8x1 board in the foot and three in the headboard gave it a nice balance and reduced the need to rip any planks. The 4x4s were cut to accommodate those plank dimensions. The tops of the head/footboards were a ripped and shaped 8x1 board.

I routed a v-groove in the sides and foot to break up the expanse of timber, sanded it all down and used a dark stain - local meranti varies so much in colour, from golden blonde to ashy dark, that staining is pretty much compulsory.

As to method:

Cut rails, cut posts, cut stretchers - test fit.

Make 'spacer'

Drill pocket-holes in rails and stretchers

Route groove in posts, route v-groove in rails and foot stretcher.

Support end of rail, use spacer to get correct height against post and seat pocket-hole screws - same at the other end and for stretchers. This almost completed construction :)

Measure and cut slat - fit support cleats and centre support rail using slat as template/guide.

Use slat as template for cutting the rest of the slats - test layout/fit slats.

Glue boards in footboard and headboard.

Cap footboard and headboard with ripped board - panel pins and glued.

Finish sand, wipe down, varnish.

All in all, it is very sturdy - Meranti is heavy stuff. I could have used much lighter gauges of timber, but apart from the 6x2s, it was what I had lying around, so the dimensions almost dictated themselves.

I did do some further 'trim', by shaping the capping planks on my table saw - a quick and effective way of 'raising' a panel.

You can find the plans here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/k99w5pik5pezmxa/pUU2TUwlKM

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Polyurethane stain varnish - dark smoke.
Estimated Cost: 
$100

Modern Vertical Slat Top Console

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About This Project

This was built out of Douglas Fir (2x4's) and Pine (1x4's) and was painted in the color espresso (Behr). I used Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane to seal it with a semi-gloss coating as well.

Pine, Douglas Fir
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Sanded using a finishing sander with an 80 grit sandpaper, then completed the sanding using a 220 grit. Applied two coats of paint in the color espresso (Behr). Then applied a single coat of Minwax Indoor/Outdoor Helmsman Spar Urethane Semi Gloss.
Estimated Cost: 
$40

BatStool

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About This Project

Kids Stool. Not the hardest project, but a fun one.

I am so happy with how the paint job turned out. Did the support boards yellow to look like his utility belt. And the Leg have accented Blue like his gloves/boots.

My wife painted the logo on after tracing the pattern. She did an amazing job.

The top isn't one piece, because I didnt have a thick enough piece that was 13" in diameter. So its actually three boards from an old pallet, glued and pocket hole screwed together.

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Custom Painting
Estimated Cost: 
$5

Joli's desk

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About This Project

I built this desk by combining a modified Julia nightstand and the schoolhouse desk. I added a little ribbon and some upholstery tacks around the upper edge. I rescued the chair from Goodwill and added the zebra cover. I also made the mirror using the barnwood frame plan.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Day Project (6-9 Hours)

My first work

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About This Project

I built this to fill a large space in our new kitchen. I extended the plan to 6ft. and added a drawer. We topped it with a beech-wood butcher block from Ikea and I used 2 6'x18" pine boards for the shelves.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Week Long Project (20 Hours or More)
Finish Used: 
The butcher block is oiled and the shelves are finished with 3 coats of Minwax PolyShades in Satin Pecan. The frame is Dutchboy satin.
Tags: 

Wall jewelry cabinet

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About This Project

Needed something to help my daughter keep track of all her jewelry and especially earrings. This plan seemed to fit.

I decided to use small wooden dowels on one section and angled one for rings. For the doors I used metal window screening and stapled it on.

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Some behr Lemieux gloss I had left over from my daughters bedroom.
Estimated Cost: 
40.00

Retirement Gift Man Crate

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About This Project

This man crate is a gift for a co worker who is retiring. We'll put all his keepsake gifts in here and he'll have to open it with a crowbar. :) The dimensions on this were adjusted to the size of 17" long, 12" wide, and 10 3/4" high (about the size of a case of copier paper). It is made with 1/2" birch plywood and poplar craft boards. I chose to use the hardwood plywood since I found out folks would be signing it, and it's much easier to write on this with a ballpoint pen than on regular plywood. Plus, less sanding for me to do ! ;)

To keep it from being so heavy when it's filled, I substituted 1/4" plywood for the top and bottom, and left the trim off of the ends. I arranged the pieces so the trim on the front & back covered the cut ends of the 1/2" plywood.

The lettering was traced on (it's "Stencil" font, in 105 pt size, printed from Powerpoint) using a ballpoint pen to dent the surface, then a black Sharpie pen to outline. Hubby thought it looked nice just with the letters in outline, and that's shown in the picture.

Also on this one, I made a little gift tag with some clip-art, and mod-podge'd it to the bottom.

Birch plywood, poplar boards
Required Skill Level: 
Starter Project
Estimated Time Investment: 
An Hour or Two (0-2 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Unfinished - left it this way to make it easier for folks to sign the crate.
Estimated Cost: 
$35 for hardwood plywood and poplar trim boards

My new and amazing outdoor bench

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About This Project

Thank you for the easy and fun bench plan.
It was really easy to install.
Even my 2 little daughters had fun (-:

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Starter Project
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Bondex walnut

Rustic Table

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About This Project

My wife and I wanted a rustic looking table for our cabin and didn't want to pay a fortune for it! This was my first project and I found it pretty easy to make. The finish is Briwax Rustic Pine and I was so happy with how it turned out I had to build some chairs to go with it! The chairs were made from a plan I found for making chairs using 2x4s

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Briwax Rustic Pine.

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