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Doll Bunk Beds

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About This Project

Started by making these bunk beds for my 9 year old and then I made another for my 6 year old. I couldn't help myself, so I made 12 more for other people to give as Christmas presents. Thanks Ana!

pine
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
none or spray paint
Estimated Cost: 
$10

Toy box

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About This Project

I have been wanting a good size toy box for my son and after finding this project here, I decided to build one for him for Christmas. Eli is going to be so excited!
This is a pocket hole version.

plywood and pine footers
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Finish Used: 
Cavalry blue satin paint from Lowe's. Basic white in semi gloss letters
Estimated Cost: 
$75
Tags: 

Almost wall to wall garage storage

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About This Project

I didn't use one of your plans for these shelves but wanted to share it here since I learned how to build because of you! These were really easy to put together and only cost $100!!! I have the step by step plans on my blog.

Stephanie

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)

Plant Stand with Casters

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Yellow Pine

I have 3 very large house plants that are a pain to move, say when you want to put your Christmas tree up in your largest window, which is usually where they sit. Two of them are so large that I cannot move them without fear of hurting myself or my house, so I decided to build my own flower pot stands with casters.

I used one 1x3x8 and one 1x2x8 of yellow, 5 1x3 cut to 18in. and 4 1x2 cut to 18in.

When she was all put together, I applied Minwax's Golden Pecan with 2 coats of Polyurethane to seal it from any water mishaps. I struggled between just sealing it and adding a little color with the stain. I think the Golden Pecan did the trick, highlighting the pretty wood grains of the top pieces, even though my big ol' pot will cover up most of it.

More pictures and a tutorial are available on my blog.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Golden Pecan, 2 coats of Polyurethane
Estimated Cost: 
$15-20

Our rustic outdoor bench

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About This Project

Pine and Cedar

My younger brother, John, and I built this bench during the weekends during the first few months of "back-to-school" as a way to spend time with each other. This is a variation on the simple outdoor bench by Ana. Our mainframe was built of regular 2x4s and the slats with pine, while the legs and the exterior wood was of cedar that was leftover from when our parents built our log home 20 years ago. Since we used the cedar, we also had to wash the logs with special logwash, and wait for them to dry, so our project took a little longer than most. Due to the staining, which was the stain used on our house we ended up putting a light clear coat over top of the stain since we didn't want it to be rubbing off on our clothing during use (since it's not typically used as furniture stain). Our Dad did have to help us a bit with the log legs that needed to be cut with a chainsaw and he sandblasted (he's a stone engraver by trade) the wood to make it look a little more weathered and "rustic." Overall it was fairly simple and my brother and I are both very pleased with the outcome, and this project has driven me to start making my own simple bedroom furniture when I move out for graduate school!

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Day Project (6-9 Hours)
Finish Used: 
A log house stain and wash. Would not recommend, since it requires some up keep and had to be reapplied several times, including a clear coat.

Modern King Farmhouse Bed with Canopy

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About This Project

3/4" birch PureBond plywood, premium pine, and standard lumber

Although I have experience building projects and using tools, this was my first Ana White project. I am a huge fan! I wanted a little bit more modern take on the Farmhouse bed with canopy, so I attached the headboards and foot boards directly to the 88" tall 4 x 4 posts. This was done instead of creating the king farmhouse bed first and adding the canopy on top of it like the plans show. I used solid 3/4" birch plywood instead of the planks for the headboard/footboard for a more streamlined look. I also used 1 x 4's around the entire perimiter of the headboard/foot board instead of just the top and bottom. I am thrilled with how it turned out, it looks exactly the way I wanted it to! Step-by-step information on how I built the bed are on my blog at decorsanity.com. Thank you Ana, you rock!!

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Week Long Project (20 Hours or More)
Finish Used: 
1 sprayed coat primer, 1 sprayed coat Behr flat paint in Polar Bear White, 1 coat sprayed Minwax Polycrylic
Estimated Cost: 
$350

Desk Bling accessory sets for Christmas

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About This Project

These desk sets were made from scrap wood and left over finishes, and are the inspiration for the desk bling accessory set plan, the cedar 1-board desk accessory set plan, and the 1-board cedar 2 drawer desktop storage cube plan. I had a ball planning and building these 4 sets over the summer, and gave them to the girls at work today as Christmas gifts. They were a big hit!

The cube sides and drawer fronts are made from scraps of wainscoat paneling.

The gray set is a distressed finish (not shown - the matching cube storage included pulls painted in oil rubbed bronze). The Espresso painted set received pulls spray-painted in silver. The Onyx set was stained with Minwax Express color, with pulls spray-painted in silver. The blue set received 2 coats of paint, and a Walnut glaze. Those pulls were done with a gray paint wash, with sea glass pebbles glued on the fronts.

The pulls are all made from pieces of S4S moulding, sanded and then painted. These also received a poly topcoat before attaching with super glue.

Total time for each set is about an afternoon each. Each set received multiple coats for the finishes, but was well worth the effort.

For some added "bling," I raided my stash of sticky-back felt scraps and applied to the bottoms of each piece, along with the drawer bottoms.

pine, birch plywood
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Gray: 1 coat white, 1 coat gray (Ace, Greek Column), distressed with 100-grit sandpaper, 1 coat polycrylic satin. Espresso: 3 coats Benjamin Moore aura paint in Wenge, 1 coat polycrylic satin. Onyx: 2 coats Minwax Express Color in Onyx (brushed on), 2 coats polycrylic satin. Blue: 2 coats Clark & Kensington tinted to Benjamin Moore's Blue Echo, glazed with Minwax Express Color in Walnut, top coated with Minwax Oil Modified water based poly in satin.
Estimated Cost: 
all materials already on hand, except for the sea glass (purchased at Michael's)

Faux Mantle

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About This Project

Whitewood boards

1st of all I want to apologize for posting several of my builds at once. I am not trying to steal the show, but I'm just deciding I would like to share my builds.

Ok, now to this build. I didn't get this mantle from this site but still wanted to share. I used the one from "blue roof cabin" site and adjusted it to my desire. I wanted my depth to be bigger so I used 1x8's to bring it out from the wall more. I got the backing idea from "Netties Expressions" by using Whitewood V-Groove Wainscot wall panels.

I plan on building one from Ana's site to do one for my dining room. I check this site daily just to see what you all have built so I can get more ideas. Thanks Ana for sharing your builds.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Finish Used: 
Rustoleum black cherry and dark walnut.

Media Console

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About This Project

I built this media console several months ago. In the beginning I saw the one Ridge Media Console and loved it, but I don't have the right tools to make the drawers like the plans, so I decided to take a couple of plans to make mine different. I also wanted to build a console that was easy enough because I'm still a beginner. I also loved the Benchwright media console and used some of the plans to get what I wanted. The storage flips down by adding euro hinges. And I added doors. I added my own silver decorative pieces. At 1st I thought that was too much silver, but now I like it. When I first built it I would pass by it and had to remind myself I did not buy this at a store, but built it. I can't say how much it cost because frankly I'm not that organized just yet. Since I'm a beginner I go back and forth to Lowes getting something here and there. Lowes and me have this weird relationship. They wonder why I'm there AGAIN; and I just keep coming back, AGAIN. They better watch it, I may dump them for Home Depot - lol.

For the finish I used Rustoleum stains and finishes. I use this because I don't wipe them off and they dry quicker. I use one coat and it's done. Dries by the end of the day and ready for poly. I added the pic for the stain, but Lowes didn't have my colors on their website (shame on you Lowes).

The colors I used were 1 part black cherry and 2 parts dark walnut. I loved the colors so much I plan on using them for the rest of my builds in my living and dining rooms.

Whitewood boards
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Finish Used: 
Rustoleum black cherry and dark walnut.

Kitchen table

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About This Project

Prime Kiln-Dried Southern Yellow Pine

This was my first real build. I did some small furniture pieces for my grand-daughters to get my foot wet. I used the farmhouse table plans but mostly built by memory, which caused me to do it differently. Our Lowes don't carry 4x4's that's untreated so I glued two tx4's to get the legs. I still like the outcome. This build was during the spring of this year and it's still holding up. I didn't have a kreg jig so I used glue and brackets. I've learned so much since building and still learning. I used a water based stain and finish because I was concerned about the spill my grands would make. I'm planning on doing my dining table differently (using my mini kreg).

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner

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