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Nightstands Per Daughter's Specifications From Ana's Plans

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About This Project

Mix of pine and spruce.

Our newlywed daughter was searching for nightstands for their new home. When we gave her a Daddy gift card for the Ana-White plans Nightstands she accepted as she would be able to decorate per specification and not because of some store color. She also received a superior product to what she was shopping.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Painted per our daughter.
Estimated Cost: 
Estimated cost for both is less than $75.00

Wooden Cooler Stand

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About This Project

Milled, big box store Pine

We built this as a birthday gift for family members and boy were they excited. We, though, were not excited to let it go. So happy with how it turned out.

The plans are good for reference but make sure to make your own measurements when using milled lumber from a big box store. Some of the the changes we had to make on the fly were to the back and front panels having to use a different combination of board sizes to fill it in without massive gaps. Its recommended that you lay them out first before attaching them to the frames. Also the measurements on the cooler lid were smaller by 1/4" to 1/2" of what's listed in order to get a snug fit.

The shelf on ours is two 1x6's cut to the width of the whole project (around 16.5") and then the shelf brackets were also 1x6's cut to a length of 10". Brackets are mounted inside the legs using wood glue and three 2.5" screws through the backside/inside of the cooler box to hide (obviously done before the cooler was inserted).

For drainage we attached a 2" piece of 1/2" inside diameter clear tubing that was fed/jammed through the cooler drain and pulled through the other side and then a 1/2" push on adapter, threaded on the other end screwed unto a 1/2" faucet head. Drilled a 3/4" hole about 2.5" (center mass) from the 2x4 cooler base through the middle piece on the side. We placed the cooler in first and used a pair of pliers to grab the clear tube and line it up with the hole and then pushed a long screw driver through the tube from inside the cooler in order to guide the faucet head/adapter combo into the tube and stiffening the tube so it didn't collapse when pushing it on.

We couldn't decide what do to with the center display piece and then remembered we had a can of chalkboard spray paint left over from another project. We spray painted the whole menu board and then painted the "logo" at the top before clear-coating it with a protective enamel. Its a snug fit so the pressure holds it in place but you could also use velcro strips on the back if that tickles your fancy. We took the snug fit route that way if they didn't want the menu board in. A 1/2' hole was drilled towards the top so they can use a finger to pull the board out.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Custom mix of Minwax American Pine and Rustoleum Kona. Paint
Estimated Cost: 
$70 + the cost of beer to fill it

Cottage Vanity

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About This Project

Built this for my cottage out of 3/4" birch purebond and pine. I finished by pickling the purebond and painting the pine and then used a laminate countertop.

Pine and Birch Purebond
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Minwax
Estimated Cost: 
140

Linen closet

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Pine, Sanded Plywood

I needed a place to store towels and other items in my bathroom. This was the perfect project for this. I have friends begging me to make one for them. Not too hard and it definitely does the job!

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
I used Annie Sloan Chalk Paint on this (2 parts Pure White and 1 Part Florence).

Backpack and Homework Center

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pine fence boards, 3/8" sanded plywood, hobby board

I needed a solution for my kids backpacks and disorganized papers. I was able to come up with organizer using a quarter-sheet of plywood, a fence board, and a 4' hobby board. It involves ripping the plywood into smaller strips, so I table saw would be helpful, but the project is totally do-able with just a skill saw.

You basically notch 3 divider boards, attach it to a piece of plywood and build a box for each cubbies. I added lag screws and washers for decoration, and some small coat hooks for storage.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
oxidizing solution and clear, matte lacquer.
Estimated Cost: 
$35 - with hardware

Solar Birdhouse

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2x4 & 2x8 (Pine

Simple/Fun project

Build Instructions:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Birdhouse/

Video of the build:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU5ffvweSjQ

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Stain

Farmhouse Table

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About This Project

I followed the plans pretty closely. As you can see, I added an extra 2X4 inside the uprights. This gave me room to mortise the 2X4s that run under the table top. Very sturdy and useful. The third pic shows when we used this table for a birthday party. Matched up exactly with our dining room table! It only took one extra 2x4 to make the alterations.

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Natural
Estimated Cost: 
$107

Modern Industrial Adjustable Work Stand

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$120 for 2 bases, one top ... less if you have scrap lumber and pipe

The hard part of some woodworking is what to do with the stuff BEFORE and AFTER it goes through the tools.

We need an infeed and outfeed table for routers, drill press, and saws but have no room to install a permanent workbench with an adjustable tool lifter.

We saw the coffee table to desk height adjustment mechanism and lightbulbs went off! This adjusts! We can take the top off! It stores!

The first photo shows it adjusted to align with the miter saw's cutting area.

As built, there are a couple of changes:

1 - It's taller. Lowest table height is about 30" ... add 8 inches to each leg.

2 - We only used 1 leg brace, about half way down the leg. Cut it to fit after you get the legs screwed to the top.

3 - the wobble of the adjustable bar on the threaded rod is not good for precision woodworking ... the second picture shows the guide pipe that keeps the threaded rod straight up and down.

4 - No pocketholes (sorry Anna) because this is a workbench, not fine furniture.

5 - The tops are cut from one sheet of 4x8 3/4 in melamine coated MDF ... 2 are 2x6 and one is 2x4.

This could also make an adjustable craft table. Raise or lower it to handle fabric for your sewing machine.

construction lumber and melamine coated MDF
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Day Project (6-9 Hours)
Finish Used: 
None
Estimated Cost: 
$120 for 2 bases, one top ... less if you have scrap lumber and pipe

Console Table

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About This Project

The Tryde Console table was the inspiration piece. Used kreg jig to join the top boards and connect the legs and aprons. The bottom stretchers were similar to the Farmhouse table plans. I plan on using this outside for a grilling table. I am not going to apply a finish - I want to see how the wood changes when exposed to the elements - hopefully it gets a nice Restoration Hardware-type finish.

Pine 2x4s and 2x6s
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
No finish

Console Table

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About This Project

The Tryde Console table was the inspiration piece. Used kreg jig to join the top boards and connect the legs and aprons. The bottom stretchers were similar to the Farmhouse table plans. I plan on using this outside for a grilling table. I am not going to apply a finish - I want to see how the wood changes when exposed to the elements - hopefully it gets a nice Restoration Hardware-type finish.

Pine 2x4s and 2x6s
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
No finish

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