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Modified Husky Farmhouse Table

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Fir, maple (legs)

We built this farmhouse table for my Mom's house, to create a space big enough for our growing family to gather at holidays and birthdays. We added to the size- the final dimensions were 82″ (long) x42″ (wide) x 30″(tall). It is a huge, chunky table! My parents prefer natural finishes, so we gave the natural wood several protective coats of polycrylic. 

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)

How to Build a Laundry Pedestal

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2x4s, MDF

I was tired of stooping to do laundry with my front-loading washer. I used the plans for Sausha's washer/dryer pedestals and tweaked them a bit.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Day Project (6-9 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Platform: semi-gloss latex paint + primer; legs and side: chalky finish paint.
Estimated Cost: 
$200

Ana White chicken coop with modifications

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We started with the basic chicken shed coop plans and modified it some. We wanted the peak to be in the front for ease of access and to allow leaves from tree overhead and rain and snow to fall to the back away from the entrance. The windows raise from the inside using 1/8" wire secured on the inside with a rope cleat hook.

We added Dutch doors. We added latches for the pop door to keep it iopen or closed as needed. Dutch doors also have decorative latches and eyehook latches to secure them when they are fully open. I rested the shed on 12 in. x 8 in. x 12 in. concrete patio pier blocks to allow drainage. we extended the roof about 6 " to allow for extra protection and avoid dripping whe  it rains.

On the inside I have a roost and a poop deck. Hanging from the poopdeck I have their feed to keep it off the floor and keep shavings, etc. from getting into the food. The poop deck  and the floor are covered with comercial grade tile to facilitate easier cleaning.

construction grade 2x4s. plywood, sheathing
Required Skill Level: 
Advanced
Estimated Time Investment: 
Week Long Project (20 Hours or More)
Finish Used: 
White KILZ primer, Glidden Kenya for walls of coop and basic Glidden white. and Glidden red for Dutch Doors, for 1X6 under roof Glidden dark brown
Estimated Cost: 
$1,000 including tools (Keg Jig) decorative hinges, wood, sheathing, shingles.

Planked Wood Sideboard - 2nd Ana White Project

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My wife and I looked all over town for just the right piece of furniture for our entry at our new home. After looking and looking I decided I would build this plan. Turned out amazing and all our friends want help building their own.

pine
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Dark walnut minwax and polycrylic finish
Estimated Cost: 
$350

Simple 2x4 Bench

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Untreated Pine

I made this in an afternoon. Loved this project. It is made with 2x4's using a Kregs Jig and mitre saw (plus additional tools like a drill and square).  This was my frist time using the Kregs Jig and I am sold!!

The free plans were taken from another website. They are very detailed and there is even a video (I recommend it as he gives a great tip for making sure the back stays equal/level to each other before putting the back on). Even though you can build this by yourself, I did have help for the heavier sides once they were assembled.  I plan to build the additional side table soon and finish them both with sanding and staining when the weather seems less iffy for rain.

If you are looking for a good beginner project that doesn't take forever or have complicated steps, this is your project.

 

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Estimated Cost: 
Around $50
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Farmhouse Kitchen Island

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I found the bead board and post for the legs at a reclaim store. I had so much fun doing this!! 

 

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Estimated Cost: 

Mofified Rectangles Day Bed

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About This Project

I was looking at getting the West Elm Rectangles Day Bed, however, the bed was a bit too tall.  The window sill of the room was 26" high and I didn't really want the bed above the sill.  I found the plans on this site and decided to modify the plans so that the top of the bed would be flush with the top of the sill.

To make the bed fit, I removed 2" from the height of the rectangles (10" cuts instead of 12") and 1/2" from each of the top and bottom joiners (1 3/4" cuts instead of 2/1/4").  Finally, the corener legs are each cut to 26" instead of 30".  The makes the be 7" off the floor instead of 8".  Overall, I'm really happy with how it turned out.

 

A couple of things I learned:

1.  I used clear pine for the wood.  It was very smooth to begin with, so I didn't need to sand it.  I primed all the wood prior to cutting.

2.  The pine was not all exactly the same size.  This means that I could only have one side completely flush and needed to decide if it was the inside of the outside of the bed (I choose the inside).  I sanded the outside a bit, but all the pieces still weren't completely flush, but I didn't care since it would be facing the wall.  You may be able to get better results with more expensive wood.

3.  Get a Kreg jig.  I bought the pocket unit for ~$20.  It was very useful for creating joints.  Make sure to do a test joint as I initially set the depth incorrectly and drilled too deep (luckily I DID do a test piece)

4.  I did not buy the Kreg plugs.  Instead, I just used wood filler.  For each hole, I covered with wood filler, let dry and sanded.  I then put on a second coat and sanded again using 300 grit sandpaper.  You can not tell there are any joint holes, and am very pleased with how the joints look.

5.  I did not use the Kreg Jig on the 1/3/4" top/bottom rectangle joiners, I just used 3" wood screws and screwed throught the top/bottom in from the top/bottom.  I used a Big Gator Drill Guide to drill a pilot hole that was perfectly perpendicular (as I don't have a drill press) prior to screwing the pieces together.  Filling the holes with wood filler and sanding (twice) worked well.

6.  Sanding!! I sanded a lot to get the paint to be very smooth.  It was a bit of a pain as I did it all by hand.  I think a belt sander might have made some of the sanding go a bit quicker, but the rectangles day bed has so many inside areas to sand, you're going to have to do some by hand.

7.  I used a primer on all surfaces and sanded the primer smooth prior to the final coat(s).  For painting the final coats, I used a foam brush as the paint was pretty thin and I did not want to see any brush marks.  I considered spray painting the final coat, but it was just easier to do by hand.

Type of wood - Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Week Long Project (20 Hours or More)
Finish Used: 
Benjamin Moore Advance Waterborne Interior/Exterior Alkyd (high gloss white)
Estimated Cost: 
$250 (including Kreg Jig and Big Gator drill guide)

Child's Bench with Arbor

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About This Project

This was a weekend build made from plans right here on Ana-White's site. There were a few changes made to make it sturdier since several (older) rambunctious toddlers were going to be using it. If anyone is interested in how much weight it can hold, two adults sat on this and it held up great. We have had this in the back yard for over a year now and it looks just as it did when it was first built.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Primed and painted with exterior paint.
Estimated Cost: 
Under $100. Not sure about actual cost since we had wood, primer, and paint on hand.

Asian inspired outdoor bench (no screws!)

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Treated

This is made by using treated lumber and concrete deck piers. The genius of this bench is that there are no screws. It fits together like a puzzle and sits on concrete deck piers. I left it untreated for a bit and decided to let the piers stay gray. The original plans called for the piers to be stained black and a stain to be applied to the wood. I wanted to post this as inspiration but will add the link to the template for the wood pieces at a later time. 

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
I have future plans to use simple decking stain in a cherry color for the wood part and black concrete stain for the concrete deck piers.
Estimated Cost: 

Walnut Media Console

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Walnut

Media console for the living room made out of walnut.  Semi-inspired by the Rustic X Console.  Speaker shelves made to match.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Waterlox
Estimated Cost: 
$350 Walnut Lumber, $20 Waterlox finish

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