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Farmhouse Desk

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About This Project

Pine

Due to a little plumbing mishap I found myself having to redo my son's room. One of the things he wanted was a desk so I found these plans for the Library Card Play Table and figured with just a tiny bit of tweaking this would be the perfect desk for my son. I opted not to go the library card route and stuck to a solid drawer face on each drawer and I cut the legs a little longer so that the desk sat at 30" tall. My son loves the desk and so do I.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
I painted one coat of Miss Mustard Seed's Shutter Grey Milk Paint and then lightly sanded it with a fine grit sanding sponge. I then sealed it with a mix of 3 parts furniture wax to 1 part antique wax.
Estimated Cost: 
$50
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Backyard Bliss!

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Treated 4x4"s, 2x4"s, 2x6"s and 1x6" deck boards.

I built this outdoor play area for my kids this past summer.  The area under that portion of the deck was always messy and muddy and so I wanted to make use of it.  I built the deck and anchored it with lag bolts to the deck supports.  On the one side I used rubber mulch and on the other there is play sand.  I dug holes in various locations and filled with gravel to allow for drainage under the sand and mulch.  For the awning I used plain cedar shingles.  I added a shower that is just regular 1/2" metal pipe with a hose adaptor.  The shower wall and fence are just old pallets that I had for a while, cut to size, which was pretty much random but they came out great.  I added a misting system under the awning that works great, the kids love the cool mist on the hot days. Overall, a heavy job ripping up the grass, moving the wood, gravel, stones, sand and mulch, but a fun deck build and even better experience doing this with my kids by my side!  

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Week Long Project (20 Hours or More)

Kentwood Bed

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About This Project

Pine

My son used to have a flimsy headboard and frame that drove me crazy so I decided to build him a bed from these plans. I couldn't be happier with his bed. I used pocket holes and everything has been holding up quite nicely. Love these plans.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Apply 2 coats of Miss Mustard Seed's Typewriter milk paint mixed one part paint to one part water. Sand with a fine grit sanding sponge then seal with Miss Mustard Seed's Hemp Oil. Wipe off any excess oil.
Estimated Cost: 
$100

Cutting Board

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About This Project

walnut, purpleheart. yellowheart and maple

My Dad made a few cutting boards for christmas.  I've added a few additional photos and tips on my blog -  http://www.woodworkingfourdummies.com/blog/more-cutting-boards.

thanks for looking.

 

Ian

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Finish Used: 
mineral oil
Estimated Cost: 

Reclaimed Wood Headboard

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About This Project

Built from standard wood from HD and then aged.  

Pine
Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Standard Paint and low grain sanding blocks.
Estimated Cost: 
$110

Sunday Trinket Box Assortment

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pine craft boards, 1x scrap pine, and 1x cedar board

     These were built to demo the Sunday Trinket Box plan using 3 different wood types – 1/2" thick craft board, 1x scrap wood, and cedar 1x.  On the 2 that I made with 1x boards, I used some ¼” hardwood plywood scrap for the inner lids, which kept the top nice and light and worked very well.  I think I prefer this for the inner lid when working with the 1x material and would recommend that for the build.  My craft room work table looked like a mad scientist’s laboratory with all the cans and tubes of finishes I’ve been trying out, and projects at different levels of completion.  

     The craft board box is finished with 1 coat of Rustoleum Stain + Poly in Walnut (the kind in the tube, I had picked this up at Michaels to try it out), and 3 coats of gloss polycrylic.  The radiata pine craft board took this stain really well, even without wood conditioner.   The inner lid for this one is the same ½” craft board used for the box.   The pull for this one is a rectangle of cedar, with a light coat of Varathane stain + poly in Walnut, and a coat of gloss poly.   Cost:  Wood:  $8.47 for craft boards, Finish:  $0 (used finishes already on hand).

     The scrap wood box is finished with 3 coats of Clark & Kensington semi-gloss in Crushed Peanut, a stencil design added on the front in gold craft paint, and a DIY pull made from a ¾” wide “slice” of the ½” thick craft board, topped with a scrap of ¼“ x 1 ½” poplar craft board, super-glued and pin-nailed together, and finished with 2 coats of gold craft paint and 2 coats of gloss polycrylic.   The pull is attached with crystal clear super-glue.  Cost:  $0 for wood (scrap), $0 for finishes (left over), $4.99 for the stencil (which I am re-using) and $4.99 for a pkg of 4 stencil sponge brushes (also re-using these).

     The cedar 1x box is finished with 3 coats of gloss poly. The knob is another DIY – a ‘slice’ of the 1x cedar, topped with some ¼” aromatic cedar, glued and pin nailed together.  This received 1 coat of Rustoleum Walnut Stain + Poly on the top part and 2 coats on the bottom part, topcoated with 2 coats of gloss poly, and was super glued to the top.  The inner lid for this one is a piece of ¼” plywood, glued and clamped in place.  The front design re-uses the stencil, in the same Rustoleum Walnut as the pull.   Cost:  Wood: about $5 worth of a cedar 1x8 (cut down to size on the table saw).  Finish: $0 since the finishes were already on hand. 

    These were a super easy and quick build – I built and sanded all three in an afternoon.  I’m sure the finishing could all be done in a day too, but I spread mine out a few minutes here and there as I had time to work on them, while changing my mind several times on the pulls and embellishments.  These were all given as gifts.

 

 

Required Skill Level: 
Starter Project
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Craft wood box: Rustoleum Walnut Stain + Poly, Minwax gloss polycrylic Scrap wood box: Clark & Kensington semi-gloss in Crushed Peanut, 3 coats; stencil/knob: gold acrylic paint (2 coats on stencil, 1 coat on knob) Cedar box: 3 coats Minwax gloss polycrylic; stencil/Knob: Rustoleum Walnut stain + poly
Estimated Cost: 
$0-10

Dog Crate Bookshelves

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About This Project

Standard Pine

I took Ana's standard dog kennel, turned it 90 degrees and placed the door where the side would be.  From there I built upward, including a book shelf section to use the space above the crate more effeciently.  I also increased the height of the crate to 32 inches to match the height of a standard crate.  The door was modified to use the large 3 inch pieces because the 2 inch was too flexible in my opinion.  This is the second one I have built, learning from the mistakes of the first one.  I added L brackets on the inside to make it so I could take it apart, and used the Kreig Jig so I can replace parts as they wear out or are gnawed on.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Red Mahogany to match my mahogany roll top desk next to it.
Estimated Cost: 

"Big Boy" headboard

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About This Project

Pine

I built my son his first "big boy" bed and we needed a headboard so my wife loved this one, and now my son does too! 

With pocket holes this was pretty easy to do, great plans, I had to modify the dimensions a bit since we didn't build the Hailey bed. We built a twin version of the Captain's Storage bed, so this matched up with it with only a few minor adjustments. Thanks for the plans and the great site.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Milk paint (typewriter color with curio color) distressed, sealed with Hemp Oil
Estimated Cost: 
35

"Grow" Stool

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About This Project

Pine

I built this step stool for my son's new "big boy" bed. I built the bed and ended up being a little high for him. So I decided he'd probably like to have a little stool to use to help him get up in the bed. He loves it.

I made it with scrap wood that I had from making his bed. I love the simple design and it is very easy to build. I did use a set of metal stamps and stamp "GROW" onto the stool. We used milk paint and then sealed it with Hemp Oil.

Thanks for all of the plans, love to create stuff!

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
An Hour or Two (0-2 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint (curio color), sealed with Hemp Oil
Estimated Cost: 
3 bucks
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My daughter and niece's new stables, they painted them themselves

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About This Project

my first project, the second went a lot easier. We are still waiting on the doors to dry to hang them but the girls are excited for their horses to have a place to sleep.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Estimated Cost: 

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