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Modified Queen Farmhouse Bed

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Pine/Douglas Fir

I'd been looking for plans to build a bed, since I wans't finding anything even remotely affordable that I liked in the stores, especially anything solid wood.  I live in a renovated 4-square farmhouse, so the farmhouse bed plans seemed like an obvious choice.  I absolutely loved the style, but I wanted to modify it a little.  The original plans closely replicate the PB bed it is a knock off of, but I wanted a taller footboard that would come up above the mattress.  I cut the footboard panels to 23" instead of 15", and the footboard posts to 35" instead of 21".  

I scored on a gallon of oops paint at HD for $9, so total for this project was about $150 including the finish materials, $130 for just the lumber and hardware.  This included adding an extra 1x8 to accomodate for the taller panels on the footboard.  I did get 6' 1x4s instead of 8', which brought the cost and the material waste down some.  Overall, my scrap pile was pretty tiny when I was done.  It took me about a week to complete this project, but I worked slowly and a lot of time was spent watching paint/stain/urethane dry.  It probably could have been done in a weekend if I was diligent.  

Should I ever need to move this bed, I purchased knock down bed rail fasteners here and cut my 2x10 rails to 80", then mounted them to the posts with the fasteners 60" apart.  I used 2x2s cut to 80" for "cleats" on the inside of each rail, glued and screwed about every 4" with 2.5" screws.  Then I cut five 2x4 slats to 60" to sit on the cleats.  

I measured from the floor to the top of the cleats and cut three "feet" from the 2x4 scrap to screw to the center of three of the slats to add center support (not shown in CAD drawing), as many mattress warranties require this.  This sounds confusing, but I just used leftover chunks of 2x4 from the slats to make a "T" with three of the slats - top, middle, and bottom - so these slats rest on both the cleats and the floor.  I have a split queen foundation, so I was worried about sagging.  So far so good, feels super sturdy!  The knock down fasteners are very secure, and there isn't a single wobble or squeak to be heard.  

To get a good finish, I used a good wood filler.  I think it was a JB brand wood repair product that was like a two part epoxy.  I didn't just fill the screw holes, I filled any gaps and uneven places where joints didn't meet 100% exactly, like where the 4x4s meet the 2x4s.  I didn't skimp on the sanding, either, even though I hate doing it, and even sanded lightly with 220 between coats of paint.  The stain over the paint was totally experimental, but I loved the way it came out.  

I'm super happy with the end result, but the taller footboard puts the bottom of my box spring around 13.5" off the floor - which gives me room to store stuff under there, but also makes for a very tall bed.  Obviously you can adjust how high you want to hang the rails, I just wanted the bottom of the rails to line up with the bottom of the footboard panel, so it ended up tall.

Everyone who has seen this bed, or at least a picture of it, is absolutely in love with it.  It's a showstopper in my bedroom, for sure.  

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Behr paint & primer in one in satin enamel, Minwax stain brushed on and wiped off to distress, Helsman spar urethane to seal. Painted two coats of paint (unknown oops color from Home Depot); lightly sanded edges and added random marks with flat head screw driver; brushed on Minwax wood finish in dark walnut and wiped off after 2-3 minutes (work in small sections at a time); sealed with one coat of spray on spar urethane once stain was dry.
Estimated Cost: 
$130-150

Not So $10 Ledges

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Yellow Pine

About 2 years ago when we were redoing our kitchen, I made these ledge shelves inspired by Ana White's $10 Ledges.  I originally wanted to use them as storage for spices and our olive oil, but once our vent hood was installed, there just wasn't room for them, at least not as I had originally intended.  Since mine are made of yellow pine (harder wood) and I used a 1 x 6 for my platform instead of a 1 x 4, my ledges cost more than $10.

Required Skill Level: 
Starter Project
Estimated Time Investment: 
Afternoon Project (3-6 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Annie Sloan's chalk paint with 2 coats of poly, sanding between coats.
Estimated Cost: 

Simple Modern Outdoor Sectional Armless Section

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Pino

Esta Es la copia del Proyecto Llamado,  Moderno sencilla Pecado Seccional Sección brazos al aire libre, Si me Hizo Fácil Por los Planos tan faciles, Pienso HACER mas y de colores llamativos, Gracias Ana.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
An Hour or Two (0-2 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Como consejo les puedo decir que deben ir verificando las medidas y cuadrar el asiento.
Estimated Cost: 
$ 50
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Simple Console - First Build!!

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Pine

Ana's simplest console inspired my first build. I decided to make it a bit wider like one I saw on Shanty 2 Chic's website, and this is what I came up with. So excited about my first build - can't wait for the next!

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Minwax water based stain in Latte. Olympic indoor paint in Brigade.
Estimated Cost: 
$50

Patio Table w/ Built in Coolers

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california redwood

Fairly easy table to built, just be careful measuring for coolers.

Required Skill Level: 
Intermediate
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Spar Urethane
Estimated Cost: 
$160
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Outdoor concrete/wood coffee table w/ browning emblem

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Douglas fir

My first project using countertop concrete mix.  This specific concrete calls for very low water mix ratios, and I was hesitant to over water the mix. I should have used more because it came out very pourous. Not bad over all though. I used a urethane Matte finish on the concrete and a semigloss poly for the wood base that is made from 4x4's and 2x4's. I used a special walnut color stain from minwax for the base and used a browning triler hitch cover for the emblem.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Minwax Special walnut for base color Urethane Matte on concrete Semigloss polyurethane for the base

Country Desk

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Poplar & Aspen

I wanted a good solid desk for my office and I thought these plans were perfect. The wood, screws, paint, and stain all cost less than $30. Instead of using 2x4's for the top I used a solid piece of aspen. I then stained the top and painted the bottom white.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Weekend Project (10-20 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Estimated Cost: 
$30
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Modified Emerson Cabinet

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Made this cabinet to go between the fridge and stove in my kitchen. I based it on the Emerson plans (although heavily modified) because I love the looks of that buffet. Came out huge and quite square (its about the size of a washing machine), and it holds soooo much. Great to have that much extra storage in the kitchen.

Required Skill Level: 
Beginner
Estimated Time Investment: 
Day Project (6-9 Hours)
Finish Used: 
Kona stain
Estimated Cost: 
~$100.00
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