Sawhorse Outdoor Bench

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Sawhorse Outdoor Bench

Free outdoor sawhorse bench plans!

HANDMADE FROM THIS PLAN >>

Projects built from this plan. Thank you for submitting brag posts, it's appreciated by all!

Author Notes: 

Hi everyone! 

Thank you so much for all the plan love, pins and shares on the Outdoor Sawhorse Table Plans we posted a few weeks back!

We are so glad you love the plans that we had to get you matching bench plans!

I teamed up with Whitney from Shanty2Chic to design and build these benches and share the plans with you!

But before we get to the plans, please take a second to read Whitney's post on building an finishing these benches and also see lots more photos!  See you back here for the plans.

XO Ana

Shopping List: 

5 - 2x4 @ 8 feet long
1 - 2x6 @ 8 feet long

2 1/2 inch pocket hole screws
wood glue
wood filler
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
drill
compound miter saw
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above
Cut List: 

4 - 2x4 @ 15 1/2" long (both ends cut at 10 degree double bevel ends ARE parallel)
2 - 2x4 @ 15 1/4" long, both ends cut at 10 degree ANGLE off square, ends ARE parallel (not a double bevel like the end legs)
3 - 2x4 @ 5 5/8" long (longest point, both ends cut at 10 degrees off square, ends NOT parallel)
3 - 2x4 @ 12 1/2" long (both ends cut at 45 degree bevel, ends NOT parallel)
2 - 2x4 @ 88"
1 - 2x6 @ 88"
2 - 2x4 @ 32 1/4" (one end cut at 25 degree bevel, other at 17 degree bevel, cut in same bevel direction)

Step 1: 

A Kreg Jig is highly recommended for construction of this project.

Build your two end leg sets using 1 1/2" pocket holes and 2 1/2" pocket hole screws and glue.

You can also build the center leg (see last diagram) now.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Attach legs to headers with 1 1/2" pocket holes and 2 1/2" pocket hole screws and glue.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Build your bench top with pocket holes first (unles you are using outdoors and will require water drainage, then leave spacing between boards to allow water to drain).

Then attach legs to the underside of bench top. Overhang is 10 1/4' from ends (see diagram 5)

Step 4 Instructions: 

You can either build the entire center leg (see last diagram) and attach you did the outside legs, or attach middle header here.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Attach cross supports with 1 1/2" pocket holes and 2 1/2" pocket hole screws and glue.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Attach center leg to center.

For additional support, the center leg could also be tied into the outside legs.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Whitney also framed the bench top out for additional support and looks - check out how she did that here.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Comments

Do you two ever stop building? LOL! Another great collaboration and beautiful build by the Shanty2Chic girls! Love that carpet, too!!! Oh yes, the lanterns as well. The whole setting = beautiful!

Love the table, but I am wondering is the best type of wood for this project. Would it be better to use pressure treated wood and cedar or just plain 2 x 4 untreated.
thanks

Love the table, but I am wondering is the best type of wood for this project. Would it be better to use pressure treated wood and cedar or just plain 2 x 4 untreated.
thanks

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