Upholstered Toybox Ottoman

Toybox by day, cozy reading spot by night.  This toybox ottoman features a lift off lid and a large storage compartment.  Use caster wheels to create a moving seating surface and toybox in one.

Author Notes: 

Well, I was really bad, terrible, in fact . . . on this project.  I didn't take photos along the way.  So I thought I would point you in the direction of one of my friends that did take photos along the way while building a storage ottoman.  Fresh Home Magazine has a wonderful tutorial on building a storage ottoman.

This ottoman was basically free for me.  I used up an old duvet cover that our puppy had chewed a hole in for the fabric, a scrap 1x12s made from various materials (everything from plywood to even a piece of particle board) and I had foam leftover from another project.  The legs were also unscrewed from another project as well, but I found that I just don't really care for these legs, so I removed them.  
Shopping List: 

1 - 1x12 @ 8 feet long

1/4 Sheet - 1/2" plywood 
3 Yards Fabric - For beginners, choose an abstract pattern
2 Yards Upholstery Batting
1 - 3" thick foam piece, 16" x 32"
4 - legs or caster feet
1/2" staples
spray adhesive
2 inch screws
1 1/4 inch finish nails
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Cut List: 

2 - 1x12 @ 32"

2 - 1x12 @ 14 1/2"
2 - 1/2" Plywood @ 32" x 16"
Step 1: 

The first step is to build a simple box out of the 1x12 boards. You can use either the 2" screws or 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Now tack one of the pieces of plywood to the bottom with the 1 1/4" finish nails and glue. You may wish to paint and seal the inside of the toybox at this point.

Step 3 Instructions: 

Foam time. Spray foam the remaining piece of plywood with the 3" thick foam piece to the plywood as shown above. Then spray glue the batting to the box and to lid as shown above, neatly trimming edges. You can bring the batting on the box around the inside and staple in place to create some cushion to keep little fingers from getting pinched if you wish.

Step 4 Instructions: 

You can also cover the sides of the top with batting too so that it matches the box. Just spray glue in place and trim the excess off with a knife or sharp scissors.

Now take a measurement of the top, width and height. Add half inch to each measurement, and cut a square of fabric out to this size. If you want, you can take a second and sew piping along the edges of the top piece. Next, cut a length of fabric out that is 6" wide x the total length around the top (width + length x 2) and sew the length to the top piece, to make up the sides.

For those of you who do not like to sew, you could alternatively cut a piece of fabric that is 6" wider and 6" longer than the top measurement, and simply staple it over the top, neatly folding corners, as done by Fresh Home magazine. I just really liked the custom fit piping look.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Now the box has not been upholstered. Simply measure around the entire box and add an inch. Then cut a piece of fabric that is this long by 20" wide. Sew the ends together to make a giant ring of fabric. Place this fabric over the box, and neatly staple the bottom edge of the fabric to the bottom. Then staple the top edge to the inside of the ottoman. Attach legs and place the top on and you are done!

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. 
 
 It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Weatherly Pergola

A pergola with a little extra fancy touches, that is both easy to build and can accommodate a variety of footings.  Works with the rest of the Weatherly Collection.

Author Notes: 

The big reason I've resisted putting up plans for a pergola is not the building of the pergola, but creating a foundation that will hold the pergola securely to the ground, even on a windy day.

But when I saw Pottery Barn's $5200 price tag on their Weatherby Pergola, I thought of all the things that I could do with $5200, like take a nice vacation or pay off a bill early, and I thought that many of you probably have the same concerns.
But that doesn't mean we still can't have a fancy pergola in our backyards.  Because our sweat is worth quite a bit of money.
The first and most important part of this project is to set your footings properly.  There are several different means to do this - if you are setting your pergola on a wood deck or concrete patio or other stable level foundation, you can simply screw the post brackets to the deck as done here by Popular Mechanics.  It's a good idea to review this link regardless, as there is lots of good information in there.
Now if you don't have a foundation in place, you are going to have to make one for the pergola.  This can be done to whatever degree you see fit, and depends on what type of soil is on your lot (hopefully gravel  :)  )
Diagram is from Ramp Foundations.  
So you might have to dig to China if you don't have gravel and pour sauna tubes, or you might get lucky and just be able to bury concrete pier blocks (the kind with the leveling brackets on top are really slick) - but whatever type of foundation you choose, just consider that a pergola needs to be secured to the ground.
Well, I'm quite sad, as we live in Alaska, and it's still very much Ice Fishing Season, and there are no pergolas to be built here for the next few months.  So I'm very much looking forward to seeing yours.
Shopping List: 

4 - 4x4 treated posts - 10-12 feet long

4 - brackets or pier blocks or other foundation as necessary
8 - 2x4 Treated - 12 feet long
9 - 2x2 Treated - 12 feet long (if you can't find 2x2s, buy 3 - 2x6s treated and rip the 2x6s into three 2x2s per board using a table saw)
2 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long (these could be furring strips)
2 - 1x4 Treated @ 8 feet long
3/4" x 3/4" moulding, exterior preferred
3 - 1x10  treated @ 8 feet long
3 - 1x8 treated @ 8 feet long
(if you can't find treated 1x8s and 1x10s, these boards will be covered and are vertical, so you can use properly sealed boards if necessary)
2 1/2 inch screws
3 inch screws
1 1/4 inch finish nails
2 inch finish nails
2 1/2 inch finish nails
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
hammer
safety glasses
hearing protection
level
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 

16 - 2x2 @ 3 1/2" long (short cleats)

16 - 2x2 @ 6 1/2" long (longer cleats)
8 - 1x8 ripped to 6 1/2" width @ 30" - cut to length
8 - 1x10 ripped to 8" width @ 30" - cut to length
16 - 1x4 @ 9 1/2" (longest point, both ends mitered at 45 degrees off square, not parallel)
3/4" Moulding cut to fit
8 - 2x4 @ 140" Long, ends cut in decorative pattern
9 - 2x2 @ 140" long, ends cut in decorative pattern
Cutting Instructions: 
It is recommended that you cut boards as you go on this project.
Step 1: 

So you first and foremost need to set the posts in the ground. Make sure you space the posts exactly as shown above, and that the posts are square (take diagonals). The posts need to stick out of the ground 107" - but you may need the posts to be longer if for example you are using buried pier blocks.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Now on all the posts, attach 2x2 cleats as shown here with 2 1/2" galvanized finish nails and glue. The bottom cleat should sit just above the brackets that hold the posts to the ground.

Step 3 Instructions: 

And now simply complete the cleats by adding the other 2x2s as shown above.

Step 4 Instructions: 

For this plan, you must have a tablesaw to rip boards with nice square edges. Rip your 1x8s down to 6 1/2" widths and use finish nails to attach to the cleats. The trim boards should be cut so that they hide the foundation. You could get extra fancy here and actually cover these posts in stone veneer as well.

Step 5 Instructions: 

Now you will need to rip your 1x10 boards down to width and finish covering the base of the posts. Finish nails and glue.

Step 6 Instructions: 

And now a little cap for the posts. Just miter 1x4s at 45 degrees around the bases as shown above. Use finish nails and glue to attach.

Step 7 Instructions: 

And measure and add the moulding for a little extra touch. Use 1 1/4" finish nails and glue.

Step 8 Instructions: 

Okay, now comes the fun part - where we start seeing results. First cut all of your pergola top board ends into a fancy pattern of your choice. Then screw (3" exterior screws) the first boards up as shown above. Use a level to make sure that the boards are level.

Step 9 Instructions: 

The diagram above should read 22" of spacing between the boards.

You will want to take a square of the project here (see step 1). When your diagonals match, rest two more 2x4s on top of the existing 2x4s, to the outsides. Screw to the posts as shown above.

Then add the remaining 2x4s spaced 22" apart, using either brackets, pocket hole screws, or long screws carefully predrilled and countersunk from the top.

Step 10 Instructions: 

And now the final 2x2s. Space these out and screw to the 2x4s and to the 4x4 post when present with 3" exterior wood screws and glue. Make sure you fasten to all of the 2x4s for the most support.

Step 11: 

And this isn't what's done with the Pottery Barn one, but I'm a big believer in corner bracing. If you feel your pergola has any wobble or needs a little extra support, you can cut corner braces and screw on - you will be amazed at the difference the corner bracing does. Other means of "beefing up" the pergola (for example, high snow load or high winds) would be to use 2x6s boards instead of 2x4s and to notch out your boards) as done in the link given in the author notes.

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Room: 
Skill Level: 
Style: 

Hailey Storage Daybed with Back and Arms

Part of the Hailey Bedroom Collection, this daybed is a simple modification of the Hailey Twin Storage bed, and features front only storage compartments.

Author Notes: 

Well, it's been four nights of not so much bliss, but certainly progress, as Gracie has been so excited about her brand new bed, that she is actually sleeping in it . . . with Mom of course.  

I'm personally pretty excited to about Grace's bed plan, The Hailey Storage Bed, because it is designed to easily convert to a full or twin bed . . . and now a daybed!
Shopping List: 

Materials to build one bench from the Hailey Storage Bed Plan

2 - Sheets of Particle Board, 4x8
1 - 1x4 @ 6 feet long
3 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long
3 - 2x4 @ 8 feet long
2 - 1x3 @ 8 feet long PLUS 1x3s for the slats
1 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long
2 inch screws
2 1/2 inch screws
2 inch finish nails
120 grit sandpaper
primer
wood conditioner
paint
paint brush
Tools: 
measuring tape
square
pencil
safety glasses
hearing protection
level
countersink drill bit
General Instructions: 

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

Dimensions: 
Dimensions are shown above.
Cut List: 

1 - 3/4" Particle Board @ 72" x 32 1/2" (Headboard Panel)

2 - 3/4" Particle Board @ 33" x 27" (Arm Panels)
1 - 1x4 @ 72" (Headboard Trim, Bottom)
1 - 1x2 @ 72" (Headboard Trim, Top)
2 - 2x4 @ 48 1/4" (See step 1 about ripping legs down to 3" wide)
1 - 1x3 @ 80" (Top of Headboard)
1 - 2x2 @ 75" (Cleat for Slats)
4 - 2x4 @ 30" (Arm Legs - See step 1 about ripping down to 3" wide)
4 - 1x2 @ 33" (Arm Trim)
2 - 1x3 @ 39" (Top of Arms)
Approximately 14 slats cut to length from 1x3s
Step 1: 

This bed heavily relies on the information provided in the Hailey Storage Bed plans, so please review that plan (link above) for detailed instructions and to build the storage bench.

Step 2 Instructions: 

Build the headboard panel as shown above. Please review step 3 because and the Hailey Storage Bed Plan, because this bed assumes that you ripped your 2x4 legs down to 3" wide (take 1/4" off each edge to make the edges nice and square). You will need a table saw to do this right. But you can use standard with 2x4s by simply subtracting an inch to the panel and trim (so you would cut your panel 71" wide and the trim 71" wide too). Attach trim as shown above.

Step 3 Instructions: 

The best way to get a nice tight joint here is to use pocket holes drilled every 8-12" on the back, with the jig set to 3/4" stock. Use glue and attach with 1 1/4" pocket hole screws.

It's going to be tricky to drill these pocket holes, so get some help holding that plywood up :)

Step 4 Instructions: 

Now we simply add the top trim as shown above.

Step 5 Instructions: 

And a cleat to support the mattress. The cleat needs to be 75" long (error in diagram), and should overhang the legs by 1 1/2" on each end.

Step 6 Instructions: 

Now it's time to build the arms - which are basically taller footboards from the Hailey Storage Bed plans. Build exactly as the headboard - with the different dimensions. Remember that the dimensions shown above are for legs made from 2x4s that are ripped down to 3" wide. If you use off the shelf 2x4s, you will need to subtract and inch from the panel and panel trim.

Step 7 Instructions: 

Now the exciting part, the can't wait till the hubs gets home to help me haul it into the house and assemble it! You've made the bench, you made the arms, and the headboard. Now assemble as shown above, without the slats. Start in this order: 1) attach the arms to the front bench with 2" screws from the insides of the cubbies into the legs of the arms 2) attach the headboard to the arms with 2 1/2" screws from the back into the legs of the arms 3) adjust so that the spacing for the mattress is square 4) take a measurement of the slat length and cut your slats to fit 5) screw slats down and put your mattress on top!

Preparation Instructions: 
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Project Type: 
Estimated Cost: 
Skill Level: 

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